Christopher Parsons, Pierre-Louis Vézina, 15 August 2018

One of the largest refugee waves in recent history was that of the Vietnamese boat people. This column examines the long-run effect of the resettlement of Vietnamese refugees across the US on exports from the US to Vietnam. The first wave of refugees in 1975 was followed by a 20-year trade embargo on Vietnam. Following the lifting of sanctions, the share of US exports going to Vietnam was higher and more diversified in the states with larger Vietnamese populations. This evidence of the pro-trade effect of immigrants is a reminder that hosting refugees can represent an investment in the future.

Christopher Parsons, Pierre-Louis Vézina, 23 May 2014

Immigrants potentially foster international trade by reducing trade costs. This column uses the exodus of the Vietnamese boat people to the US as a natural experiment to provide evidence of such a pro-trade effect. An exogenous allocation of Vietnamese migrants across the US in 1975 was followed by a 20-year trade embargo. Following the lifting of sanctions in 1994, the share of US exports going to Vietnam was higher and more diversified in the states with larger Vietnamese populations.

Lorenzo Rotunno, Pierre-Louis Vézina, 24 November 2010

Smuggling is a pervasive phenomenon that often results in violence, distorted competition, and loss of tax revenue. This column argues that international migrant networks facilitate smuggling across borders, showing that the presence of Chinese-born migrants abroad increases tariff evasion in both China and host countries.

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