Kai Gehring, Stephan A. Schneider, 18 February 2020

Secessionist parties draw upon rhetoric on cultural identity and political autonomy to garner votes. However, the parties’ electoral success is also influenced by the availability of regional resources. This column examines two secessionist parties in the UK – the Scottish National Party and the Welsh Plaid Cymru – and the divergence in their performance following the discovery of oil within Scotland’s hypothetical maritime borders. It finds that a 10% increase in relative regional wealth is associated with an increase of 3 percentage points in the vote share of secessionist parties. Relative regional resource wealth is more important than absolute wealth, and changes in regional resource wealth only play a role when there is baseline support for secession.

Thorvaldur Gylfason, Eduard Hochreiter, 08 December 2010

Croatia and Latvia both gained independence in the early 1990s. This column tracks their progress since. It shows that the two are growing but at different rates and with varying cycles. It argues that investment in human capital, good governance, and institutional reform have been vital for development and while Latvia is catching up, Croatia remains the more efficient and wealthier of the two.

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