Swati Dhingra, Rebecca Freeman, Eleonora Mavroeidi, 30 March 2018

After Brexit, the UK will have to negotiate which provisions to include in its new arrangements, and a fundamental question is which provisions are most important in reducing non-tariff barriers to trade. This column uses a gravity model to show that trade agreements with deep provisions have the largest impact on domestic value added. The UK’s entry into a deep trade agreement with either the US or China/India that encompasses non-tariff liberalisation of services, investment, and competition can increase economic activity in industries that are key to its innovative activity.

Marion Jansen, Valentina Rollo, Olga Solleder, 19 March 2017

Standards and regulations form an inherent part of international trade. This column presents evidence – based on two novel datasets – that suggests that for firms the distinction between voluntary standards and government regulations is blurred, that export revenues of small firms are hit twice as hard by burdensome regulations as those of large firms, and that firms active in larger markets have access to a higher number of voluntary standards.

Dennis Novy, 28 May 2014

The negotiations for the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership are about a year old and making only slow progress. This column argues that TTIP is a long-run project that will probably take several years to complete. Despite its significance to global trade, without support from the top echelons of government it might falter.

Paul Brenton, 17 March 2012

Africa trades too little with itself. This column argues that what is needed is an approach that reforms policies that create non-tariff barriers; puts in place appropriate regulations that allow cross-border movement of services suppliers; delivers competitive regionally integrated services markets; and builds the institutions that are necessary to allow small producers and traders to access open regional markets.

Lucian Cernat, Marlene Madsen, 23 March 2011

Compared to recent headline-grabbing events, dealing with “behind-the-border barriers” and keeping protectionist tendencies at bay might seem to be small potatoes. This column argues that the “murky protectionism” that affects €100 billion of trade will have profound implications for Europe and the rest of the world, and as such is worthy of attention.

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Economies in the Asia-Pacific have witnessed the collapse of their trade flows to a degree unprecedented in modern economic history. While protectionism has not been the first-choice policy reaction in most countries in the region, there is a fear that non-tariff protectionism still may intensify if recovery slows down. This workshop is dedicated to the study and discussion of different aspects of non-tariff protectionism.

Richard Newfarmer, Elisa Gamberoni, 04 March 2009

Trade protection is on the rise around the world and risks pushing the economy into prolonged contraction. Officials have proposed more than 60 new trade restrictions since the beginning of the financial crisis. While a serious outbreak of protectionism has yet to occur, vigilance and leadership are required.

Hiau Looi Kee, Alessandro Nicita, Marcelo Olarreaga, 18 July 2007

Trade openness matters, so the measurement of trade restrictiveness matters. Commonly used measures, however, are deeply flawed. New research, using theory-based measures, has generated two new global databases on the restrictiveness of trade policy at the most disaggregated level.

Events

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