Peter Draper, Andreas Freytag, Matthias Bauer, 16 April 2011

The economic fate of developing countries since the global crisis has been in doubt. In the second of two columns on the “Seoul Consensus”, the authors argue that industrialised economies are not in a position to take the lead in initiatives to strengthen economic policy rationality on a global scale. Emerging economies should take the lead and push for the conclusion of the Doha Round.

Robert Townsend, 17 December 2010

Robert Townsend talks about his recent book, co-authored with Krislert Samphantharak, that analyses household finance in developing countries using integrated household surveys. Townsend describes how to create new and more comprehensive household ‘accounts’, and use them to analyse productivity, capital structure and liquidity in households. The interview was recorded in London in November 2010. [Also read the transcript]

Johannes Van Biesebroeck, Timothy Sturgeon, 10 August 2010

Could the car industry in developing countries start to produce vehicles that can compete domestically – perhaps even globally? This column argues that while the prospects for the automotive sector are still less promising than for other industries, as the markets for motor vehicles shift to the developing world and production inevitably follows, more development and design work will shift as well.

Bernard Hoekman, Guido Porto, 18 June 2010

When developing countries open up their markets, there are costs as well as benefits. This column presents findings from a collection of papers investigating adjustment to trade. It argues that unemployment is only part of the story, adding that the development community should aim to address the constraints that prevent too many households from seizing the newly available opportunities.

Fabrizio Coricelli, 01 May 2010

Why have emerging economies weathered the crisis better than advanced countries? This column summarises a session given by Alan Winters, Saul Estrin, Thorsten Beck, and organised by Nauro Campos at the Royal Economic Society annual conference in March 2010. The contributions argue that the crisis may have long-lasting effects on migration, foreign direct investment, and financial development in Africa.

Bilal Habib, Ambar Narayan, Sergio Olivieri, Carolina Sanchez-Paramo, 19 April 2010

A shortage of real-time data hinders evaluations of the impact of the global crisis on developing countries. This column uses a “microsimulation” approach to assess the poverty and distributional effects in Bangladesh, Mexico, and the Philippines. It finds that poverty will increase by well over a million, and that the crisis has been hardest for middle-income households.

Nauro Campos, 22 December 2009

Does ethno-linguistic fractionalisation stifle economic growth? This column presents new evidence that considers how fractionalisation changes over time and treats it as both a cause and an effect of economic growth. While fractionalisation is found to have a negative effect on growth, it also changes over time, contrary to conventional wisdom.

Matthias Doepke, Fabrizio Zilibotti, 12 October 2009

Rich-country governments and consumer groups pressure poor countries to discourage child labour through boycotts and international labour standards. Yet child labour continues unabated. This column suggests international activism may be partially to blame, because reducing the use of child labour in the formal sector decreases domestic pressures to prohibit it throughout the economy.

Michael Spence, 11 September 2009

In fifty years, 3.4 billion people in developing countries will approach advanced country income levels with consumption, energy use, and emissions patterns to match. In this column, Nobel Laureate Michael Spence argues that advanced countries should lead the way with technology and a global strategy to reduce the carbon intensity of their economies. That will lay the groundwork for developing economies to follow a sustainable path as they graduate to higher income levels.

Emmanuel Frot, 13 May 2009

Developing countries are expected to be severely hit by the recent financial crisis. This column says that based on previous crises, aid flows to developing countries should be down by 13%. However, donor countries’ pledges may soften the shock this time around.

Gary Hufbauer, Sherry Stephenson, 11 May 2009

The crisis has delivered a particularly strong blow to export revenues of small developing countries. These nations have limited room for deploying anti-cyclical packages and, as a group, do not account for a significant amount of total world trade. They should thus be temporarily awarded policy space to adopt trade measures to counter the impact of the current economic crisis.

Michael Spence, 17 April 2009

Nobel laureate Michael Spence of Stanford University talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about the work of the Commission on Growth and Development, the prospects for and the obstacles to achieving sustainable growth in developing countries, and the impact of the global financial and economic crisis on the growth agenda. The interview was recorded at the American Economic Association meetings in San Francisco in January 2009.

Kemal Derviş, 19 March 2009

What policy measures might reduce the economic damage developing countries suffer from the global crisis? This column says that developing economies should seek emergency liquidity, IMF reforms, greater fiscal support, and more humanitarian development assistance at the London summit next month.

Ronald Mendoza, 10 January 2009

Adverse shocks to poor households can cause significant long-term damage to their well being. This column argues that stabilisation policies ought to make protecting vulnerable families and children from shocks a central priority rather than ad hoc and ancillary in development strategies. Countries’ future economic growth and human development are at stake.

Nauro Campos, 08 November 2008

This column presents evidence that lobbying is not only much more prevalent in developing countries than previously thought but also much more effective than corruption as a means of influencing public policy and supporting enterprise growth.

Carlo Carraro, Valentina Bosetti, Massimo Tavoni, 01 October 2008

Policymakers seeking to fight global warming need to reach an international agreement for post-2012 climate change policy, but developing countries seem unlikely to immediately participate. This column explains the importance of full global participation in reducing greenhouse gas emissions and proposes means of inducing developing countries, most notably China, to participate in an international agreement.

Alan M. Taylor, Antoni Estevadeordal, 24 August 2008

The link between greater openness to trade and higher growth, once held sacred by economists, has come under contestation in recent years. The authors of DP6942 develop a growth model with a basis for trade in order to uncover the impressive impact trade has had upon growth of GDP, using data from before and after the Uruguay Round.

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EU Member States and the European Commission often assert that the EU's multiple trade preference schemes are a concrete manifestation of Europe's commitment to the development of poorer nations through trade. But what do we really know about the impact of these measures? Do they actually affect developing countries evenly? By how much? In this presentation Simon Evenett will provide a comprehensive yet accessible overview of the empirical findings concerning the operation of the EU's trade preference schemes. WIth a discussion grounded in the evidence base, he will assess if there is a gap between European aspirations and the outcomes on the ground. Implications will be drawn for European trade and development policies in general, including those initiatives associated with the Doha Round.

Hiau Looi Kee, Alessandro Nicita, Marcelo Olarreaga, 18 July 2007

Trade openness matters, so the measurement of trade restrictiveness matters. Commonly used measures, however, are deeply flawed. New research, using theory-based measures, has generated two new global databases on the restrictiveness of trade policy at the most disaggregated level.

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