Brunello Rosa, Alessandro Tentori, 26 June 2021

Digital currencies are becoming increasingly present on both research and policy agendas, including for central banks. This column explores the geopolitical role of central bank digital currencies, with a particular focus on China. It argues that such currencies could be useful as a means for central banks to record transactions in an increasingly cashless economy and could help improve central banks’ monetary transmission. Nonetheless, the risk of cyber-attacks should not be overlooked.

Bill English, Ángel Ubide, 04 June 2021

How well has monetary policy coped with the challenge of Covid-19?Central banks get good grades in a new VoxEU ebook. But Bill English and Angel Ubide warn Tim Phillips that success today may lead to problems in future.

Download the new eBook here: Monetary Policy and Central Banking in the Covid Era

Bill English, Kristin Forbes, Ángel Ubide, 03 June 2021

As Covid-19 spread in early 2020, many central banks were still struggling to boost inflation. The abruptness and speed of the economic deterioration, the sharp increase in market volatility, and the blinding uncertainty over the impact of the pandemic motivated a central bank reaction that was unprecedented in terms of size, speed and scope. A new CEPR eBook summarises the responses by sixteen central banks from both advanced and emerging economies – with chapters written by senior central bank officials and economists in each of the countries to explain the actions taken. While responses varied across countries, there are several common threads: the size, speed and breadth of the responses; the reliance on a more multidimensional set of tools; and the ability of emerging markets to behave more like advanced economies.

Patrick Bolton, Harrison Hong, Marcin Kacperczyk, Xavier Vives, 25 May 2021

The Covid-19 pandemic and recession have reinforced the need to evaluate the economic and financial impact of natural disasters, providing a pointer to the damaging effects that climate change may induce. This column introduces the third report in the Future of Banking series from the IESE Business School and CEPR, which explores the ways in which natural disaster risks are different from more familiar forms of financial risk – and how banks, asset managers andcentral banks are beginning to grapple with these risks. The authors call for a combination of public interventions and private sector mitigation strategies to reduce the long-term implications of climate-related events.

Ioana Duca-Radu, Geoff Kenny, Andreas Reuter, 09 February 2021

When interest rates cannot go any lower, the economy can be stabilised if consumers expect the rate of inflation to increase. Yet, the evidence for this stabilising effect has been very mixed. This column presents new evidence from a monthly survey of over 25,000 individual consumers across the euro area, showing that consumers are indeed more ready to spend if they expect inflation to be higher in the future. While generalised in the population, the stabilising effect is stronger when nominal interest rates ­are constrained at the lower bound.

David Bholat, 02 July 2020

Machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI) are at the heart of current transformations that some commentators have dubbed the ‘Fourth Industrial Revolution.’ The Bank of England, CEPR and Imperial College recently organised a virtual event to discuss how machine learning and AI are changing the economy and the financial system, including how central banks operate. This column summarises key topics discussed during the event and introduces videos recorded by some of the presenters, including Stuart Russell, Alan Manning, and the Bank of England’s Chief Data Officer, Gareth Ramsay. 

Maylis Avaro, Vincent Bignon, 20 July 2019

The payment landscape is changing. This column goes back to late 19th century France to explore the implications of this more decentralised and less banked landscape for the design of central banks’ interventions when fighting financial crises. The Banque de France operated a very wide discount window and used a variety of risk management techniques to effectively subdue risk-taking behaviours and to protect its balance sheet from taking any loss. This helped it to stabilise the economy and to overcome the consequences of negative income shocks.

Idris Ademuyiwa, Pierre Siklos, Samantha St. Amand, 08 November 2018

Changes in central banks’ balance sheets are often used as an indicator of monetary policy stance. This column describes the challenges associated with using balance sheet data to analyse policy. Data for 31 advanced and emerging economies reveal a potentially negative, albeit tenuous, relationship between balance sheet policies and monetary policy objectives. The finding calls for more detailed and consistent balance sheet accounting from central banks around the world.

Saleem Bahaj, Ricardo Reis, 25 September 2018

Swap lines between advanced economy central banks are a new and important part of the global financial architecture. This column analyses their role, from the perspective of central banks, in the transmission of monetary policy, and in the macroeconomic effects of policy. Results show that swap lines serve as liquidity facilities, that they put a ceiling on deviations from covered interest parity, and that they incentivise cross-border gross capital flows. 

Marcel Fratzscher, Lukas Menkhoff, Lucio Sarno, Tobias Stöhr, 23 February 2018

Central bank interventions in foreign exchange markets have long been viewed with scepticism by academics. This column examines foreign exchange interventions for a sample of 33 advanced and developing economies. Interventions occur frequently, in episodes that can last several days, and are often successful in smoothing exchange rates. These results show that central bankers, particularly in emerging markets, appreciate the efficacy of interventions.

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PLEASE USE THE BELOW LINK FOR A LIST OF TOPICS AND SUBMISSION INFORMATION - contributions are being sought for 20 contributed sessions on a wide range of policy-relevant research topics.
CEBRA’s 2018 Annual Meeting is co-organized by the Research Center SAFE (Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe) at Goethe University Frankfurt. The scientific committee is chaired by Ester Faia and Mirko Wiederholt.
Jens Weidmann, Governor of the Deutsche Bundesbank and Chairman of the Board of the Bank for International Settlements will deliver the keynote speech of the meeting.
The International Monetary Fund will organize a high-level panel on the topic “Financial Conditions, Financial Vulnerability, and Stabilization Policies”
The Deutsche Bundesbank and the Financial Stability Board will organize a high-level panel on the topic “Post-implementation Evaluations of the G20 Financial Regulatory Reforms”.

Toby Nangle, Anthony Yates, 12 October 2017

Among the many in quantitative easing programmes that central banks have engaged in to combat low inflation since the Global Crisis, the Bank of Japan’s programme stands out for its size and scope. This column explores whether the Bank’s programme of purchasing Japanese equities through exchange-traded funds has succeeded in its aim of lowering risk premia of asset prices. The Bank has timed the execution of the programme to coincide with episodes of market weakness, possibly with the aim of dampening price volatility. Over the course of the programme, however, Japanese stocks de-rated against global stocks.

Giancarlo Corsetti, Gernot Müller, Keith Kuester, 16 September 2017

The classic rationale for flexible exchange rates was that policymakers would be unconstrained by currency targets. The Great Recession, however, saw numerous central banks constrained instead by the zero lower bound. This column considers which exchange rate regime is best for small open economies in a global recession. The model suggests that if the source of the shock is abroad and foreign interest rates become constrained at their zero lower bound, then flexible exchange rates do provide a great deal of insulation to the domestic economy.

Daniel Gros, 12 June 2017

Exiting from unconventional monetary policies is now a key issue for central banks, and especially for the US Federal Reserve. This column argues that the Fed already began this exit some time ago, and that the relevant part of its balance sheet has already shrunk by about one quarter of GDP. Pursuing the current policy of reinvesting would lead to a full exit within ten years.

Michael Bordo, 23 April 2017

Beginning in 1944, the Bretton Woods system played a major role in shaping the global economy in the post-war period. This column describes how although it was successful in bringing about exemplary and stable economic performance in the 1950s and 1960s, familiar confidence and liquidity problems, as well as inflationary pressure and central bankers’ responses to it, ensured that Bretton Woods was short-lived. Nonetheless, legacies of the system, like the dollar standard, remain with us and will likely be with us for some time to come.

Luca Benati, Robert Lucas, Juan Pablo Nicolini, Warren E. Weber, 11 March 2017

Most economists and central bankers no longer consider money supply measures to be useful for conducting monetary policy. One reason is the alleged instability of the relationship between monetary aggregates. This column uses data from 32 countries and spanning up to 100 years to argue that the long-run demand for money is alive and well. Results show a remarkable stability in long run money demand, both within and across countries. Nonetheless, short-run departures can be large and persistent, and further research is needed.

Ansgar Belke, Clemens Domnick, Daniel Gros, 19 January 2017

A high correlation of business cycles is usually seen as a key criterion for an optimum currency area. This column argues that the elasticity with which countries react to the common cycle is equally important. A country with a non-unitary growth elasticity relative to the common area will experience cyclical divergences at the peak and trough of the common cycle. Despite being characterised by highly-correlated business cycles, the Eurozone suffers from widely differing amplitudes. 

Carlos Arteta, M. Ayhan Kose, Marc Stocker, Temel Taskin, 26 September 2016

Against a background of persistently weak growth and low inflation expectations, a number of central banks have implemented negative interest rate policies over the past few years. This column argues that such policies could help provide additional monetary policy stimulus, as long as policy interest rates are only modestly negative and do not stay negative for too long to avoid adverse effects on the financial sector. While these policies do have a place in the policymaker’s toolkit, they need to be handled with care to secure their benefits while mitigating risks.

Patrick O'Brien, Nuno Palma, 03 September 2016

Today's unconventional central bank policies have historical precedent. One example is the suspension of convertibility of banknotes into gold by the Bank of England between 1797 and 1821. This column argues that, although there were important differences between then and now, it demonstrates that bank reputation and interaction between bank and state are vital to the success of unconventional policies. Also, short-term unconventional policies may persist long after a crisis has passed.

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