Arvind Panagariya, 15 January 2008

Historically, successful development has involved exporting labour-intensive manufactures. Despite opening up to the world economy in many respects, India’s policies continue to retard the expansion of labour-intensive sectors. Here is a discussion of how India could speed its transition to a modern economy.

Arik Levinson, 02 January 2008

Since the 1970s, US manufacturing output has risen by 70% but air pollution has fallen by 58%. Was this due to improved abatement technology or shifting dirty production abroad?

Francesco Daveri , Cecilia Jona-Lasinio, 29 November 2007

The public debate on offshoring has created more heat than light to date, but researchers are beginning to get a picture of its real economic impact. New evidence from Italy, based on firm-level data and a direct measure of offshoring, shows that offshoring of parts and components boosts domestic productivity while offshoring of services does not.

Peter Schott, 10 October 2007

Fear of China’s industry mirrors that of Japan’s in the 1980s when the Japanese were poised to take over the world’s manufacturing and it was the yen that was undervalued. Then as now, competition is painful for US and European firms, but firms don’t stand still. Some fail, others adapt, and the best of them not only survive, they thrive.

Barry Eichengreen, 30 July 2007

Germany’s traditional specialisation in manufacturing makes China and India direct competitors. What happened to Italy as China moved up the technology ladder will happen to Germany. The key to growth lies in getting out of China’s way and finding alternative forms of high-value-added employment.

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