Asha Abdel-Rahim, Dany Jaimovich, Aleksi Ylönen, 13 December 2015

One of the most important effects of armed conflicts is the forced displacement of large numbers of civilians. When conflicts end, many who have left their homes return, facing the challenge of rebuilding their lives in post-conflict areas. This column analyses the outcomes of returning households during a short-lived interwar period in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan. Returning households, particularly those that are female-headed, face worse economic conditions. But returnees fare better on various health indicators, likely related to changes in sanitary habits picked up during displacement.

Emilie Anér, Anna Graneli, Magnus Lodefalk, 14 October 2015

A large body of research has established a positive link between immigrants and bilateral trade. However, the temporary movement of people across borders has received less attention. This column uses Swedish data to analyse the impact of temporary cross-border movement on trade. Recently arrived migrants are found to reduce the negative impact of distance on foreign trade, by assisting firms to overcome informal and informational barriers to trade with their origin country. Facilitating movement of people across borders can be a highly useful tool for engaging in and benefitting from specialised and internationalised production networks.

Thomas Bauer, Sebastian Braun, Michael Kvasnicka, 24 February 2014

The economic literature has paid scarce attention to the tens of millions of people who are displaced by conflict or forcibly relocated. This column analyses outcomes for 12 million Germans relocated from central and eastern Europe following the second world war. Labour-market outcomes were generally negative, but positive for women relocated from rural areas. Interestingly, children of migrants made greater educational investments than their native counterparts.

Timothy Hatton, 14 July 2011

Asylum is a controversial and politically fraught topic. For the people involved it can be a matter of life or death. This column introduces a new CEPR report arguing that it is high time the EU adopts an integrated policy on asylum based on historical insight, quantitative evidence, and a realistic view of the politics involved.

Timothy Hatton, 14 July 2011

CEPR's newest report tackles the thorny policy questions surrounding asylum seeking. The author argues that policy towards asylum seekers should take into account history, evidence, and a realistic view of the political economy of asylum policy. The report argues for a more centralised European asylum system and for a range of specific policy reforms.

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