Patrick Bolton, Stephen Cecchetti, Jean-Pierre Danthine, Xavier Vives, 03 June 2019

While the decade since the Global Crisis has seen clear improvements in financial regulation and supervision, there is still work to be done in several crucial areas, and political constraints may bite.This column introduces the first report in a new series on ‘The Future of Banking’, which tackles three important areas of post-crisis regulatory reform: the Basel III agreement on capital, liquidity and leverage requirements; resolution procedures to end ‘too big to fail’; and the expanded role of central banks with a financial stability remit.

Roger Farmer, Giovanni Nicolò, 20 May 2019

The economies of many countries are operating close to full capacity, but unemployment and inflation are both low. Using data from the US, UK and Canada, this column compares differences in the macroeconomic behaviour of real GDP, the inflation rate and the yields on three-month Treasury securities in the three countries. It shows that the Farmer monetary model, closed with a belief function, outperforms the New Keynesian model, closed with the New Keynesian Phillips curve. The data fit the multiple equilibria emphasised in the Farmer model well, rather than the mean-reverting processes assumed by the New Keynesian model. 

Pierpaolo Benigno, 26 April 2019

Cryptocurrencies have attracted the attention of consumers, policymakers and the media. This column investigates whether they can jeopardise the primary function of central banks, namely, controlling inflation and economic activity. Currency competition can succeed in calming inflation and preventing the sort of manipulation of interest rates and prices to which governments have historically been prone. But currency competition may also lead to government money losing the function of medium of exchange, which could be risky and lead government currency into further troubles. 

David Martinez-Miera, Rafael Repullo, 27 March 2019

Various factors have been advanced as possible causes of the build-up of risks leading to the Global Crisis, and multiple policies have been put forward to address them. This column discusses the effectiveness of monetary policy and macroprudential policy in responding to the build-up of risks in the financial sector. While both policies are useful, macroprudential policy is more effective in terms of financial stability and can lead to higher welfare gains.

Sayuri Shirai, 06 March 2019

Recent years have seen the emergence of digital currencies such as Bitcoin as potential private sector money. Central banks are also considering whether to issue their own digital tokens to enable decentralised verification of transactions while maintaining attractive cash-like features. This column lays out the four existing proposals for implementing central bank digital currency. Due largely to technical constraints, however, central banks in general have not found a compelling reason to issue their own digital currency.

Ashoka Mody, Milan Nedeljkovic, 14 January 2019

The ECB’s actions in the wake of the Global Crisis have been described as hesitant, relative to other central banks. Based on analysis of financial markets' response to the ECB's interventions during the euro crisis, this column argues that central bank interventions are effective if they clearly signal a commitment to reinvigorating the economy and if they address the source rather than the symptom of financial stress. The ECB did not follow these principles, limiting its ability to improve financial market sentiment. 

Daniel Calvo, Juan Carlos Crisanto, Stefan Hohl, 23 November 2018

A well designed financial supervisory architecture is essential for the effective functioning of any financial system. Using a survey of 82 jurisdictions, this column describes the state of financial supervisory models around the world and highlights the key institutional changes after the Global Crisis. It finds that the prevailing financial supervisory model continues to be sectoral, but that there have been incremental but important changes within existing models. Central banks have acquired more financial oversight responsibilities after the Global Crisis, and many jurisdictions have enhanced or are in the process of enhancing their consumer/investor protection supervision.

Peter Karadi, Marek Jarociński, 03 October 2018

Central bank announcements simultaneously convey information about monetary policy and the economic outlook. This column uses changes in interest rate expectations and stock prices around the time of policy announcements of the Federal Reserve to disentangle the impact of news about monetary policy from that of news about the economic outlook. It finds that both pieces of information play a significant role in the dynamics of inflation and economic growth. Controlling for news about the economy provides a more accurate measure of the transmission of monetary policy.

Saleem Bahaj, Ricardo Reis, 25 September 2018

Swap lines between advanced economy central banks are a new and important part of the global financial architecture. This column analyses their role, from the perspective of central banks, in the transmission of monetary policy, and in the macroeconomic effects of policy. Results show that swap lines serve as liquidity facilities, that they put a ceiling on deviations from covered interest parity, and that they incentivise cross-border gross capital flows. 

Björn Richter, Moritz Schularick, Ilhyock Shim, 21 September 2018

Central banks have increasingly relied on macroprudential measures to manage the financial cycle, but their effects on the core objectives of monetary policy to stabilise output and inflation are largely unknown. This column shows that the output costs of changes in maximum loan-to-value ratios are rather small, especially in advanced economies. At the same time, such policies successfully reduce household and mortgage credit growth. The results suggest that central banks could be in a position to use macroprudential instruments to manage financial booms without interfering with the core objectives of monetary policy in a major way. 

Jon Danielsson, Robert Macrae, 12 September 2018

Financial policy is determined in multiple domains by separate government authorities. This column explores the hierarchical ranking of these domains and authorities. On top is the authority in charge of fiscal policy, followed by those running monetary, microprudential, and finally macroprudential policies. This ranking can cause conflicts in terms of policy effectiveness and legitimacy.

Michael McLeay, Silvana Tenreyro, 03 July 2018

The Phillips curve – a positive relationship between inflation and economic slack – is one of the building blocks of the standard macroeconomic models used for forecasting and policy advice in central banks. On the face of it, recent findings of a breakdown in this relationship would therefore have major implications for monetary policy. This column argues that these findings are perfectly consistent with a stable underlying Phillips curve. The reason is simple: monetary policy will typically seek to reduce output whenever inflation is set to rise above target, blurring the identification of the Phillips curve in the data.

Stephen Cecchetti, 25 June 2018

Though central banks do not seem concerned about being driven obsolete by cryptocurrencies, some are considering issuing digital currencies with similar technology. Stephen Cecchetti discusses three policy implications this might have, namely for restricting the illegal use of cash, allowing for negative interest rates, and improving financial access. All three are possible, but come with risk.

Peter Bofinger, 12 June 2018

The digitalisation of money has the potential to change traditional structures of the financial system. This column discusses four areas in which it may have an impact, and argues that while digitalisation will not erode the importance of central banks, banks could be massively challenged by new forms of intermediation. 

Antonio Fatás, Beatrice Weder di Mauro, 14 May 2018

Central banks are alert to the challenge of cryptocurrencies, and are contemplating reactions ranging from prohibiting private issuance to embracing such currencies. This column argues that the risks of introducing a central bank digital currency are high while the efficiency gains do not seem large. A more efficient system can be achieved via innovation in current payment infrastructure.

Michael Bordo, Eric Monnet, Alain Naef, 18 April 2018

Central bank cooperation has once again become a central issue amid the Global Crisis and the persistence of global imbalances, but there are few examples of successful cooperation schemes that survived the test of time. This column argues that the Gold Pool of 1961-1968 offers a unique example of integrated financial cooperation between major central banks. It failed not due to members freeriding, but because they did not have to abide by any rules-based policies to prevent imbalances.

David Miles, Ugo Panizza, Ricardo Reis, Ángel Ubide, 25 October 2017

Occasionally, inflation is stubborn. For many years it was hard to bring under control, but in the last decade has been low and stable. The latest Geneva Report on the World Economy studies the latest bout of stubbornness, asking why inflation has remained in such a narrow range. It shows that a large number of diverse shocks have hit developed economies during the last decade, which have more or less cancelled each other out. One of these 'shocks' has been monetary policy, which was skilfully used in response to wider macroeconomic events. Central banks, in other words, combined good policies and good luck. Next time, however, we may not be so lucky.

Michael Bordo, Pierre Siklos, 18 October 2017

The role of central banks in monetary policy and financial stability has changed radically over time. This examines the similarities and idiosyncrasies of ten central banks, and also considers how inflation might have looked had the central banks been around earlier, or had they adopted different strategies. While important differences between the narrative and statistical analyses of crises indicate that neither is sufficient on its own, small open economies appear to do comparatively well across the various crisis conditions, and inflation is almost always higher in the absence of an inflation target.

Paul Krugman, 04 October 2017

Where did policymakers got it right? In this video, Paul Krugman explains how central banks did the right thing, whereas austerity was imposed at the wrong time. This video was recorded at the "10 years after the crisis" conference held in London, on 22 September 2017.

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Events

  • 17 - 18 August 2019 / Peking University, Beijing / Chinese University of Hong Kong – Tsinghua University Joint Research Center for Chinese Economy, the Institute for Emerging Market Studies at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, the Guanghua School of Management at Peking University, the Stanford Center on Global Poverty and Development at Stanford University, the School of Economics and Management at Tsinghua University, BREAD, NBER and CEPR
  • 19 - 20 August 2019 / Vienna, Palais Coburg / WU Research Institute for Capital Markets (ISK)
  • 29 - 30 August 2019 / Galatina, Italy /
  • 4 - 5 September 2019 / Roma Eventi, Congress Center, Pontificia Università Gregoriana Piazza della Pilotta, 4, Rome, Italy / European Center of Sustainable Development , CIT University
  • 9 - 14 September 2019 / Guildford, Surrey, UK / The University of Surrey

CEPR Policy Research