Jakub Červený, Jan van Ours, 28 September 2019

With the recent trends in legalisation and with the transition of illegal drug markets to the internet, much more detailed information about the price and quality of cannabis is now available, making an analysis of the determinants of prices easier. This column analyses data collected over a two-week period in 2015 from a dark web marketplace, which details about 500 cannabis prices from around 140 sellers in 18 countries. It concludes that the internet-based cannabis market is characterised by monopolistic competition, where many sellers offer differentiated products with quality variation causing dispersion of cannabis prices. 

Enrica Maria Martino, Edoardo Di Porto , Paolo Naticchioni, 24 January 2019

Legalisation of immigrant workers is a simple policy to implement and can be very effective in reducing undeclared labour, yet economists know relatively little about how host economies are affected. This column analyses Italy's largest ever legalisation to examine how the policy affects firms’ employment, shapes legalised migrants workers’ careers, and affects their co-workers. Despite regularising firms experiencing only very short-lasting employment growth, legalised migrants remained strongly attached to the formal labour market. High mobility of migrants to other firms, provinces and industries is an important driver of the results, helping to ensure that co-workers’ careers were not affected by the reform.

Ali Palali, Jan van Ours, 01 May 2014

There is a robust positive association between support for cannabis liberalisation and cannabis use, but it is unclear whether users have discovered that cannabis is innocuous, or if these types are inherently more liberal regarding drug policy. This column exploits variations in opinion between current and former cannabis users to work towards establishing causality. Results suggest that supporters of liberalisation are speaking from experience rather than personal interest.

Jan van Ours, Ali Palali, 12 October 2013

The decriminalisation of cannabis is a policy that divides policymakers sharply. This column uses evidence from the Netherlands to show a positive connection between early cannabis use and easy access to cannabis through coffeeshops. The policy implications, however, require further research. Closing coffeeshops could result in some potential users searching in the black market where hard drugs are available as well.

Jan van Ours, 06 December 2011

In many Western countries, between one quarter and one third of the population admit to having used cannabis at least once in their lives – according to the official statistics. This column provides an in-depth review of existing economic, social, and media evidence for and against legalisation. It concludes that although there is of course uncertainty surrounding the long-term implications, prohibition is not working and it is time to legalise.

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