Arlan Brucal, Beata Javorcik, Inessa Love, 16 August 2019

The link between foreign ownership and environmental performance remains a controversial issue. Data from the Indonesian manufacturing census show that plants undergoing foreign acquisitions reduce their energy intensity by about 30% two years after acquisition by multinationals. This column argues that foreign direct investment can serve as a channel for the international transfer of environmentally friendly technologies and practices, thus directly contributing not only to economic growth but also to environmental progress. 

Christoph Boehm, Aaron Flaaen, Nitya Pandalai-Nayar, 15 August 2019

What has caused the rapid decline in US manufacturing employment in recent decades? This column uses novel data to investigate the role of US multinationals and finds that they were a key driver behind the job losses. Insights from a theoretical framework imply that a reduction in the costs of foreign sourcing led firms to increase offshoring, and to shed labour.

James Anderson, Mario Larch, Yoto Yotov, 30 July 2019

Foreign direct investment has traditionally been viewed as a key driver of prosperity, and modern FDI has also become a vehicle for transferring intangible assets. This column uses a counterfactual experiment based on a hypothetical world with no outward or inward FDI to and from low-income and lower-middle-income countries to examine the effects of FDI on trade, domestic investment, and welfare. World welfare falls by about 6% and all countries lose out, with some poorer countries losing over 50%. World trade falls by 7%, with the losses again unevenly distributed.

Marco Buti, István Székely, 28 June 2019

The EU11 economies are among the most open economies globally. The process of trade integration and the creation of GVCs have also drove a significant inflow of FDI into these countries. This column shows that while integration in the EU and FDI have enhanced their growth potential, these developments have also made them more vulnerable to external shocks. Domestic and EU-level reforms in the EU11 should focus on increasing economic and social resilience. 

Reda Cherif, Fuad Hasanov, 16 June 2019

The 'Asian miracles' and their industrial policies are often considered as statistical accidents that cannot be replicated. The column argues that we can learn more about sustained growth from these miracles than from the large pool of failures, and that industrial policy is instrumental in achieving sustained growth. Successful policy uses state intervention for early entry into sophisticated sectors, strong export orientation, and fierce competition with strict accountability.

Marco Di Cataldo, Riccardo Crescenzi, Mara Giua, 22 February 2019

Marco di Cataldo, Riccardo Crescenzi and Mara Giua from the Global Investment - Local Development research team at LSE explore the various policy tools available to local decision-makers to attract foreign investments, and most importantly, to make the most of them.

Holger Breinlich, Elsa Leromain, Dennis Novy, Thomas Sampson, 12 February 2019

Media reports suggest that some UK firms have started to move production abroad in anticipation of Brexit. Using data on announcements of new foreign investment transactions, this column reports evidence that the Brexit vote has led to a 12% increase in the number of new investments made by UK firms in EU27 countries. At the same time, new investments in the UK from the EU27 have declined by 11%. The results are consistent with the idea that UK firms are offshoring production to the EU27 because they expect Brexit to increase barriers to trade and migration, making the UK a less attractive place to invest and create jobs. 

Sara McGaughey, Pascalis Raimondos, 29 June 2018

Researchers and policymakers often refer to ‘foreign firms’, but how do we define a firm as ‘foreign’ and does it matter for our policy conclusions? This column argues due to the dominant practice of using only direct ownership links to identify the owners of a firm, the commonly used definition of a foreign firm captures only half of the foreign firms that exist. Indirect ownership link turns out to be pivotal for identifying firms that appear to be domestic but are in reality foreign, with implications for the measurement of FDI productivity spillovers.    

Koen De Backer, Sébastien Miroudot, Davide Rigo, 19 April 2018

Multinational enterprises that produce goods rely on services to organise their value chain, so barriers to investment in services are likely to affect their production. The column uses a new and comprehensive OECD database to measure the share of services in the exports of multinational enterprises, and also in the output of their foreign affiliates. The results suggest that policymakers may need to focus more on the services that support manufacturing industries.

Kun Jiang, Wolfgang Keller, Larry D. Qiu, William Ridley, 15 April 2018

China’s government mandates that foreign investors in certain industries form joint ventures with a domestic Chinese partner. The column uses a dataset accounting for all joint ventures in China from 1998 to 2007 to show that this policy is successful in its aim of encouraging technology transfer from foreign investors to domestic operations. It finds empirical evidence for the existence of at least three channels through which this transfer takes place.

Gábor Békés, Balázs Muraközy, 28 March 2018

Globalisation has provided firms with many ways to serve their foreign customers. This column suggests that the set of internationalisation modes can be described as a ladder, with the higher rungs associated with higher levels of productivity and innovation. This ladder has three main steps – indirect exports, direct exports and outsourcing, and service and manufacturing foreign direct investment – and may provide an important source of flexibility for managers to adapt to policy shocks.

Vito Amendolagine, Andrea Presbitero, Roberta Rabellotti, Marco Sanfilippo, 24 January 2018

A new wave of foreign direct investment has swept sub-Saharan African countries, with inflows becoming more diversified both geographically and sectorally. This column presents an analysis that shows a high degree of complementarity between involvement in global value chains and FDI. Policies supporting the entry and upgrading of countries in such chains – especially via a strong institutional setting and a well-educated labour force – can help maximise the spillovers from foreign investment.

Kazunobu Hayakawa, Toshiyuki Matsuura, 09 July 2017

Foreign direct investment has generally been found to have positive effects for firms in their home country. There are, however, concerns about potential negative effects for other domestic firms in the investing firm’s supply chain. This column uses Japanese firm-level data to explore the supply chain effects of foreign direct investment. Foreign direct investment does not appear to have adverse effects on domestic transaction networks. Rather, the positive effects of firms’ foreign investing are found to spread to the whole economy through their supply chains.

Beata Javorcik, Alessia Lo Turco, Daniela Maggioni, 29 June 2017

Recent research suggests that foreign direct investment makes it more likely that host countries upgrade production. Using the example of Turkey, this column shows that while the presence of foreign affiliates does not seem to affect the propensity of firms to innovate, it is positively correlated with the complexity level of products newly introduced by local supplier firms. Foreign direct investment inflows appear to act as a catalyst to develop sophisticated manufacturing, and should be promoted as part of a domestic industrial policy.

Randolph Bruno, Nauro Campos, Saul Estrin, 25 May 2017

The economic effects of foreign direct investment are generally expected to be positive for the host economy. However, this is usually conditional on certain thresholds of development being met, for instance in terms of human capital or institutional quality. This column argues that the economic impact of foreign direct investment is less ‘conditional’ than commonly thought, perhaps because below the thresholds, the difference between private and social returns is substantial, while above them it is smaller.

M. Ayhan Kose, Franziska Ohnsorge, Lei (Sandy) Ye, 24 April 2017

Investment growth in emerging market and developing economies has slowed sharply since 2010. This column argues that this slowdown reflects a range of factors, including negative terms-of-trade shocks, slowing FDI inflows, weak activity, and rising private debt burdens and political risk. Policymakers can boost investment directly through public investment, and indirectly by taking measures to improve overall growth prospects and the business climate.

Barry Eichengreen, Poonam Gupta, Oliver Masetti, 24 February 2017

According to conventional wisdom, capital flows are fickle. Focusing on emerging markets, this column argues that despite recent structural and regulatory changes, much of this wisdom still holds today. Foreign direct investment inflows are more stable than non-FDI inflows. Within non-FDI inflows, portfolio debt and bank-intermediated flows are most volatile. Meanwhile, FDI and bank-related outflows from emerging markets have grown and become increasingly volatile. This finding underscores the need for greater attention from analysts and policymakers to the capital outflow side.

, 01 September 2016

Growth in half a dozen sub-Saharan countries is across all sectors of the economy. In this video, John Sutton discusses how African countries can attract FDI and how they contribute to creating jobs. This video was recorded at the International Growth Centre.

Simon Evenett, Johannes Fritz, 30 August 2016

In July, G20 trade ministers adopted nine 'Guiding Principles for Global Investment Policymaking'. This column introduces the latest GTA report, which shows how well the G20’s track record stacks up against these new growth-promoting goals.

Holger Görg, Christiane Krieger-Boden, Peter Nunnenkamp, 23 August 2016

In theory, firms in developing countries benefit from viable, well-used, stable, and efficient local financial markets as a source of investment for local firms. Financial markets in the home countries of multinationals can also act as a source of FDI to the developing world when local financial markets are weak. This column discusses recent empirical data that support both arguments, and argues that advocates of tighter regulation for financial markets should consider the wider impact on developing country economies.

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