Diane Coyle, 16 October 2018

Mark Gradstein, Marc Klemp, 23 June 2017

A large literature has argued that natural resources have a negative effect on economic development. The Brazilian data used in this column fail to confirm these findings. Economic activity, as measured using night-time light data, increases more during periods of rising oil prices in localities with better access to oil.  Oil revenue windfalls accruing to oil-rich locations and spillovers to adjacent locations drive this effect. 

Paul Collier, Anthony Venables, 01 May 2017

Cities are key drivers of economic growth. In this video Paul Collier and Anthony Venables discuss how public policy should create effective cities that work. This video was recorded at the International Growth Centre in March 2017.

Manthos Delis, Iftekhar Hasan, Steven Ongena, 22 February 2017

The positive relationship between democratic development and economic outcomes is well established. Using three decades of international data, this column identifies a new channel for this effect – the cost of credit to corporations. It also analyses loan pricing in Turkey to reveal a substantial rise in the average cost of lending after the attempted coup d’etat in July 2016. Together, these results highlight how efficiency in loan pricing results in a comparative advantage for firms in democratic countries over those in less democratic or authoritarian countries.

Esperanza Vera-Toscano, Sjoerd Hardeman, 06 January 2016

Education is considered to be of key importance to economic growth, jobs, and development. This column argues that higher education is not a deterministic factor driving economic performance in itself. Rather it is the skills acquired through education that drive economic development. Policymakers should take into account a range of different indicators to make a proper judgement about where education is heading and how to improve it.

Dominick Bartelme, Yuriy Gorodnichenko, 26 June 2015

Specialisation has been extensively researched at the micro and macro levels, but the middle one has received little attention. This column argues that the middle level – linkages across firms and industries within a country – can be important in economic development. Having built a database of input-output tables for a broad spectrum of countries and times, the authors show that countries with stronger linkages have indeed higher productivity.  

Andrei Markevich, Ekaterina Zhuravskaya, 28 February 2015

There is a debate among economists about the effects of serfdom on economic development. This column sheds light on this debate using novel dataset from 19th-century Russia. The findings indicate that serfdom was a crucial factor causing economic slowdown. The abolishment of serfdom was followed by a sharp increase in agricultural productivity, the living standards of peasants, and industrial development. 

Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, Viola Von Berlepsch, 02 September 2012

This paper examines the extent to which the distinct settlement pattern of migrants arriving in the US during the big migration waves of the late 19th and early 20th centuries has left a legacy on the economic development of the counties where they settled and whether this legacy can be traced until today.

Quamrul Ashraf, Oded Galor, 01 August 2011

The reasons given for the vast divide in standard of living between different parts of the world are many, with some economic historians claiming the roots lie in the colonial period. This column goes back even further to the cradle of humankind in East Africa, suggesting that the genetic diversity of the tribes that dispersed to different parts of the globe determined their success many thousands of years later.

José Tavares, Tiago Cavalcanti, 01 October 2007

The authors of CEPR DP6477 believe that it is important to provide a model-based macroeconomic estimate for the cost of wage discrimination to aggregate output. They find that the costs are indeed quite substantial which should be a certain concern in any macroeconomic policy aimed at increasing output per capita in the long-run.

Yann Algan, Pierre Cahuc, 02 October 2007

What are the fundamental causes of differences in income per capita across countries? Although there is still little consensus on the answers to this question, it is often argued that social attitudes such as trust are one of the main determinants of economic development.

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