Anatoli Segura, Javier Suarez, 05 October 2016

The Global Crisis has led many to conclude that maturity and liquidity mismatch in the financial system prior to the Crisis were excessive and not properly addressed by the existing regulatory framework. This column looks at the justification for the new minimum standard aimed at reducing banks' maturity mismatch – the net stable funding ratio – and assesses its likely impact. While the rationale for limiting banks’ maturity mismatch is strong, the reduction in maturity transformation achieved with the new standard is likely to be too drastic, actually implying a net welfare loss.

Charles Goodhart, Enrico Perotti, 10 September 2015

In the last century, real estate funding by banks grew steadily. This column argues that the unprecedented expansion of banking in mortgage lending resulted in a high degree of maturity mismatch. The solution to this problem should focus on greater maturity matching, and not using insured deposits. One avenue to do so is by securitising mortgages with little maturity transformation. Another is to create intermediaries providing mortgage loans where the lender shares in the appreciation, while assuming some risk against the occasional bust.

Olivier Blanchard, 03 October 2014

Before the 2008 crisis, the mainstream worldview among US macroeconomists was that economic fluctuations were regular and essentially self-correcting. In this column, IMF chief economist Olivier Blanchard explains how this benign view of fluctuations took hold in the profession, and what lessons have been learned since the crisis. He argues that macroeconomic policy should aim to keep the economy away from ‘dark corners’, where it can malfunction badly.

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