Yanhui Wu, 03 March 2018

Performance-related pay is commonly linked to the surging incomes of top managers over recent decades. This column presents a theory to assess the role of incentive structures in sorting labour to achieve efficiency on the one hand, and in generating wage inequality on the other. The theory offers a new perspective for studying the effects of technological progress on both the wages and employment of various groups of individuals.

Kristian Behrens, Frédéric Robert-Nicoud, 24 July 2014

Large cities are more unequal than the nations that host them. This column argues that this is because large cities disproportionately reward talented superstars and disproportionately ‘fail’ the least talented. Cities should thus be the primary focus of policies to reduce inequality and its adverse consequences for society.

Thierry Mayer, Gianmarco Ottaviano, 07 November 2007

Much of the public-policy thinking on globalisation – the Lisbon agenda, for example – focuses on winning and losing sectors. A network of teams working in tandem on eight national, firm-level datasets shows that, increasingly, both winners and losers can be found within the same sector. The analysis of firm-level data reveals new facts that are essential for future policy-making on competitiveness and globalisation.


CEPR Policy Research