Salvatore Rossi, 20 November 2008

Finance, the market and globalisation are at risk of being jointly demonised by the crisis. This column argues that the these three elements are neither good nor bad; they are just opportunities for individuals, for societies and for economies that must be understood and regulated.

Mark Schankerman, Alberto Galasso, 31 August 2008

The 'market for innovation' - the licensing and sale of patents - is one of the principal incentives for firms to invest in R&D. In CEPR DP 6946, Galasso and Schankerman set out to examine the impact that US developments have had on market efficiency, by studying the length of patent infringement disputes and find that the US system has performed surprisingly well in recent decades.

Frank Lichtenberg, Gautier Duflos, 29 June 2008

Critics allege that many new drugs are borne more from marketing efforts than medical innovation. This column discusses new research showing that the average new drug extends life.

Bruno van Pottelsberghe de la Potterie, 06 March 2008

Europe isn’t increasing its R&D intensity. Professor Pottelsberghe, former Chief Economist of the European Patents Office, identifies why Europe is missing its targets and looks to the R&D leaders – the US and Sweden – for policy lessons.

Karen Kopecky, Jeremy Greenwood, 03 March 2008

Since 1900, consumers have enjoyed a dramatic explosion in the number and quality of goods available. This column discusses a simple method for quantifying welfare gains from the introduction of new goods into the economy and their subsequent quality improvements using the personal computer as an example.

Bronwyn Hall, Grid Thoma, Salvatore Torrisi, 16 November 2007

Data on a thousand European firms show that an extra euro of R&D spending raises their 'Tobin's q' by 0.7 euros. R&D reporting, however, is not required in most European nations, so financial markets may be failing to properly value and thus reward innovative investments. One step towards the ‘knowledge economy’ would be to require Europe’s publicly-listed firms to disclose their R&D.

Sudipto Bhattacharya, Sergei Guriev, 09 November 2007

Patenting has soared in recent decades, but much intermediate knowledge is protected by industrial secrecy, so relaxing patent protection must impact the secrecy option. Recent research suggests that the relationship between patent protection and knowledge transmission is hump-shaped and sector-specific. This suggests that patent protection standards should be sector-specific.

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