Natalie Bau, Adrien Matray, 16 March 2020

The misallocation of inputs, and in particular capital, may explain the large disparities in productivity across countries. This column exploits a policy in India in the early 2000s to quantify the effects of foreign capital liberalisation on misallocation and aggregate manufacturing productivity. As a result of the liberalisation policies, capital-constrained firms expanded their assets by 60%, spent more on labour (+24%), and increased their revenue by 18% relative to non-constrained firms. The effects of liberalisation were largest in areas with less developed local banking sectors.

Anna Maria Mayda, Christopher Parsons, Han Pham, Pierre-Louis Vézina, 20 January 2020

While resettled refugees in the US historically exhibit remarkable success, this column shows that refugees also foster development to their origin countries through the mechanism of foreign direct investment. A 10% increase in refugees in a given commuting zone causes outward FDI flows to increase to their countries of origin, 10 to 15 years after having taken refuge, by 0.54%. Decisions made primarily for humanitarian reasons in developed host nations thus yield economic benefits for some of the world's poorest nations in the medium run.

Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan, 12 December 2019

Sebnem Kalemli-Özcan discusses foreign direct investment and how local conditions can limit a country's capacity to take advantage of spillovers from the investment

Marco Di Cataldo, Riccardo Crescenzi, Mara Giua, 22 February 2019

Marco di Cataldo, Riccardo Crescenzi and Mara Giua from the Global Investment - Local Development research team at LSE explore the various policy tools available to local decision-makers to attract foreign investments, and most importantly, to make the most of them.

Filipa Sá, 15 May 2018

There is growing concern among households and policymakers alike that house prices in England and Wales are being driven up by foreign buyers making investment purchases. Filipa Sá examines the link between foreign investment and house prices, using local authority data over a span of 15 years. This video was recorded at the 2018 RES annual conference.

Filipa Sá, 04 January 2017

One of the factors driving house price growth in many countries is foreign investor demand. Using new UK data, this column argues that foreign investment has had a significant positive effect on house price growth in the last 15 years. The effect is not limited to expensive homes but ‘trickles down’ to less expensive properties, and is stronger where housing supply is less elastic. Foreign investment is also found to reduce the rate of home ownership, but there is no evidence of an effect on the housing stock or share of vacant homes.

Nauro Campos, Fabrizio Coricelli, 11 December 2015

Whatever the result of Britain’s upcoming in-or-out referendum on EU membership, its relationship with the EU will change substantially. To assess these changes, it is important to understand how Britain has benefited from EU membership. This column argues that EU membership has brought benefits through three key mechanisms – trade, foreign investment, and finance. The current focus on UK exports to and imports from the EU may severely underestimate the true potential costs to Britain of Brexit.

Kristin Forbes, 12 June 2008

To pay for its current account deficit and capital exports, the US needs $2 trillion of additional foreign investment in 2008. Recent research shows that the quality and depth of US capital markets are key to attracting such investment, but the subprime crisis has raised doubts. A judicious regulatory reaction to the subprime crisis will thus be critical to the value of the dollar. If the US imposes a massive increase in poorly thought-out regulation, the dollar could quickly return to its downward spiral.

Alyson Ma, Bruce Blonigen, 13 November 2007

The allegation: China extracts rents and technology from foreign competitors, thus allowing it to grow even faster and longer than most would have imagined possible. The evidence: China’s industrial policies have been successful in attracting foreign investment, but not necessarily in increasing the sophistication of its own firms through technology transfer.

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