Stefan Pichler, Nicolas Robert Ziebarth, 12 May 2018

In the past decade, dozens of US cities and seven US states have mandated employers to offer paid sick leave. This column investigates the relationship between sick pay and influenza-like illness rates. The results suggest that the mandates reduced the spread of infectious diseases, while having no significant effect on employment or wages.

Alejandro Del Valle, 04 February 2015

Illness shocks can decimate the economic opportunities of the poor. Women’s employment opportunities are particularly constrained by illness because their time is often diverted to the care of sick children.  This column argues that the provision of publicly subsidised health insurance in Mexico has led to an increase in labour supply. This increase has occurred in part because insurance has enabled women to reallocate time away from caregiving tasks to work in the labour market. These findings suggest that health insurance does more than improve health: it also empowers women. 

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