Chih-Sheng Hsieh, Michael König, Xiaodong Liu, Christian Zimmermann, 26 November 2018

Through collaboration networks, researchers create spillovers for one another, and also other researchers indirectly linked to them. This column leverages co-authorship network data for economics to study the impact of these spillovers on total research output. Taking account of spillovers, the results show that the most productive researchers are not those with the most citations. Current funding schemes appear to be ill-designed to take advantage of the spillover effects generated in scientific knowledge production networks. 

Maria Victoria Anauati, Sebastian Galiani, Ramiro Gálvez, 09 October 2018

Economics places a strong emphasis on publishing in a narrow set of top-tier journals. However, the reputation of a journal does not necessarily go hand in hand with citation performance. This column describes how citation patterns vary greatly across tiers, affecting both the total citations articles receive and the life cycles of their citations. Nonetheless, the results suggest that too much emphasis is placed on the top five journals. 

Richard Tol, 20 April 2014

Research supervision, unlike the quality of academic research, is rarely assessed. This column proposes an index that quantifies the quality of research supervision. It shows that, on average, good researchers make good supervisors. However, many excellent researchers do not excel at supervision, and many not well-published researchers make good supervisors. Such an index could be an additional motivational factor for academics.

John Hudson, 11 November 2013

Academics are subject to new types of evaluations. In the UK this is done via the Research Excellence Framework (REF). This column discusses some of the shortcomings of the REF and the methods individual papers are ranked. New evaluations and requirements change the incentives of economists and can affect their research – sometimes not for the better.

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The Master in the Economics of Science and Innovation program examines the economic challenges faced by science and technology, the anticipated difficulties, and offers solutions while considering the timing of the foreseeable transfer process from basic research results to applications. The program aims to prepare professionals for management careers in research centers, innovative firms, public administrations and intermediate institutions geared toward promoting Research and Development activities. For more information, please visit: www.barcelonagse.eu/MESI.html

Fernanda Llussá, José Tavares, 10 December 2007

We know too little about the causes and consequences of terrorism and what we do know is not listened to. For example, existing empirical and theoretical research on the economics of terrorism contradicts common wisdom that terrorists are irrational misanthropes with little education and low income. More research is needed.

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