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The Summer School broadly addresses the theme of ‘Europe and the World’, which builds upon the academic strengths of the Brussels School of International Studies.

This programme attracts students and young professionals who wish to broaden their knowledge of the EU. Over a period of two weeks, students participate in a series of guest lectures, seminars and debates delivered by academics, policy-makers, diplomats and European civil servants. The summer school allows students to discover how the European Union functions with a particular focus on how it acts as a global organisation and the challenges it faces in today’s world.

The accommodation, tuition, entrance fees on trips, lunches throughout the 2 weeks, a 2 week travel card around Brussels and a celebratory final dinner to mark the end of the course are all included in the cost of the Summer School.

Axel Dreher, Shu Yu, 25 November 2016

The belief that educating future leaders of other countries helps spread the values of the country of study has inspired many foreign-education programmes. This column uses data on the education and UN voting patterns of 831 world leaders to show that foreign-educated leaders tend to be less friendly with former hosts, but more friendly with countries that share the host’s culture and politics. This appears to reflect a tension between ‘affinity’ with former hosts and ‘allegiance’ to domestic voters.

Ernesto Dal Bó, Pablo Hernandez-Lagos, Sebastián Mazzuca, 26 July 2016

While cases of state failure have risen in the last decade, most notably in the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa, they are not a new phenomenon. Historical evidence from the early modern period, and even the Bronze Age, shows that the majority of formed states have failed rather than thrived. This column introduces the ‘paradox of civilisation’ to characterise the obstacles settlements face in establishing civilisations. The paradox defines the success of a civilisation as a trade-off between the ability to produce economic surplus and to protect it. It is therefore important to correctly balance military and economic support when providing aid.

Michael Bordo, Harold James, 06 April 2015

The classic exchange-rate trilemma analysis argues that capital mobility, monetary autonomy and fixed exchange rates are incompatible. This column shows how policy trilemma analysis can be extended to other domains, specifically financial stability, political economy, and international relations. It argues that analysing these trade-offs can help to identify policy options that balance macroeconomic objectives and political realities in the face of globalisation.

Events

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