Simon Wren-Lewis, 29 June 2018

Simon Wren-Lewis, 27 June 2018

Swati Dhingra, Karl Whelan, Luc Frieden, 29 June 2018

2 years on from the UK’s referendum vote to leave the EU, substantial questions about the path to Brexit remain. In this special edition of Vox Talks, Tim Phillips talks to Swati Dhingra, Karl Whelan, and Luc Frieden about how the process of Brexit negotiation is itself impacting UK households already, from food price inflation to bilateral trade relations across Europe. The data suggests these effects are not transitory, but will persist beyond the current climate of policy uncertainty.

Brian Varian, 23 June 2018

Brexit has sparked interest in trade agreements between Britain and the Commonwealth. This has a precedent in the Edwardian era, when the Dominions adopted policies of imperial preference toward imports from Britain. This column argues that New Zealand’s policy of imperial preference, enacted in 1903, was ineffective in diverting trade toward Britain, suggesting that trade policies within the British Empire or Commonwealth do not always achieve what they intend. 

Simon Wren-Lewis, 20 June 2018

Stephen Byrne, Jonathan Rice, 19 June 2018

While the effect of Brexit on trade between the UK and the remaining EU member states has received considerable attention, to date little work has considered the issue of non-tariff barriers. This column explores how increased documentary compliance and border delays will affect EU members’ exports to the UK. Time-sensitive goods are found to be most at risk of suffering from increases in non-tariff barriers. Based on current trade composition, Latvia, Ireland, and Denmark are the trading partners that will be most affected.

Jonathan Portes, 09 June 2018

Pascal Lamy, 06 June 2018

Yuriy Gorodnichenko, Tho Pham, Oleksandr Talavera, 02 June 2018

The rise of social media has profoundly affected how people acquire and process information. Using Twitter data on the Brexit referendum and the 2016 US presidential election, this column studies how social media bots shape public opinion and voting outcomes. Bots have a tangible effect on the tweeting activity of humans, but the degree of their influence depends on whether they provide information consistent with humans’ priors. The findings suggest that effect of bots was likely marginal, but possibly large enough to affect voting outcomes in the two elections.

Roger Farmer, 29 May 2018

Simon Wren-Lewis, 12 May 2018

Thomas Sampson, 10 April 2018

Simon Wren-Lewis, 28 May 2018

Miranda Xafa, 18 April 2018

The Brexit vote was a clear setback in the effort to integrate European capital markets. It slowed down the implementation of the Capital Markets Union agenda to avoid pre-empting the Brexit negotiations, and risks an inefficient break-up in the activities of clearing houses that deal in euro-denominated securities. This column, the second in a two-part series, argues that there is a strong case for the Capital Markets Union project to continue with the remaining EU27 members after Brexit, including stronger central oversight.

Swati Dhingra, Rebecca Freeman, Eleonora Mavroeidi, 30 March 2018

After Brexit, the UK will have to negotiate which provisions to include in its new arrangements, and a fundamental question is which provisions are most important in reducing non-tariff barriers to trade. This column uses a gravity model to show that trade agreements with deep provisions have the largest impact on domestic value added. The UK’s entry into a deep trade agreement with either the US or China/India that encompasses non-tariff liberalisation of services, investment, and competition can increase economic activity in industries that are key to its innovative activity.

Jonathan Portes, 06 April 2018

Much public and policy concern has focused on the distributional impacts of immigration – in particular, potential negative impacts on employment and wages for low-skilled workers. This column summarises evidence and draws conclusions from the now considerable literature on the impact of migration to the UK on the economy and labour market, including the potential economic impacts of Brexit-induced reductions in migration.

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This one-day conference will bring together researchers and policymakers working on the economic consequences of Brexit. We invite submissions of papers and expressions of interest in attending. We would particularly welcome papers providing empirical evidence on the effects of the Brexit vote on the UK economy and novel studies of the potential future consequences of Brexit.

The conference will take place on September 19 in London and will be hosted by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. It is part of a series of events funded by the ESRC-sponsored UK in a Changing Europe initiative. The conference is open to attendees who are not presenting papers.

Submissions, requests for funding from PhD students and expressions of interest in attending the conference should be sent to [email protected] by May 18, 2018. Preliminary drafts of papers are welcome.

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Events

  • 17 - 18 August 2019 / Peking University, Beijing / Chinese University of Hong Kong – Tsinghua University Joint Research Center for Chinese Economy, the Institute for Emerging Market Studies at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, the Guanghua School of Management at Peking University, the Stanford Center on Global Poverty and Development at Stanford University, the School of Economics and Management at Tsinghua University, BREAD, NBER and CEPR
  • 19 - 20 August 2019 / Vienna, Palais Coburg / WU Research Institute for Capital Markets (ISK)
  • 29 - 30 August 2019 / Galatina, Italy /
  • 4 - 5 September 2019 / Roma Eventi, Congress Center, Pontificia Università Gregoriana Piazza della Pilotta, 4, Rome, Italy / European Center of Sustainable Development , CIT University
  • 9 - 14 September 2019 / Guildford, Surrey, UK / The University of Surrey

CEPR Policy Research