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If you are an enthusiastic and motivated 16-18 year old student wishing to have an unforgettable and inspirational summer experience, our Warwick Pre-University Summer School is for you. Engage with like-minded peers from around the world at our leading Russell Group University. The ten-night academic enhancement programme will give you a taste of undergraduate teaching from top Warwick faculty and you will hear from outstanding guest speakers.

You will also develop personal effectiveness skills including leadership and communication skills. Not only will you gain further understanding and new academic perspectives on a range of exciting topics but you will also get a real taste of university life by living on the beautiful and self-contained Warwick campus for eight nights. To top it off, you will also spend two nights in the amazing capital city of London - where Warwick also has a base - and visit some of the most iconic places in the UK.

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We are delighted to announce that applications are now open for the Warwick Summer School in London. We have a wide range of Economics and Social Sciences courses on offer this year including:

Behavioural Economics, Game Theory, International Development, Money and Banking, Introduction to Artificial Intelligence, Data Science – Foundations of Data Analytics, International Business and Finance, Introduction to Psychology, International Economic Law

We also have three exciting courses delivered by our collaborative partner, Communications and Marketing, Global and Digital Strategy and Public Policy and Globalisation. All courses are taught by staff who are experts in their field and credit transfer is an option (7.5 ECTS). Apply today!

Hans Fricke, Jeffrey Grogger, Andreas Steinmayr, 23 July 2015

The field that a college student majors in can affect labour market outcomes. But we know little of how exposure affects a student’s choice of major. This column shows that exposure to economics increases the probability to major in economics by 2.6 percentage points. This finding is driven by choices of male students. Exposure to the field then does not explain why relatively few women major in economics.

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