Bettina Peters, Mark Roberts, Van Anh Vuong, 30 March 2019

International markets can provide exporting firms with more opportunities to generate and introduce innovations and capitalise on their investments relative to purely domestic firms. Using German data, this column demonstrates that exporting firms introduce innovations more frequently than domestic firms and have higher economic gains from their innovations. Trade restrictions such as tariffs can affect a firm’s economic activities in foreign markets and also their R&D and innovation activities.

Bruno Merlevede, Angelos Theodorakopoulos, 24 January 2019

Studies of the implications of trade openness for local economies rarely address the domestic supply chain. This column examines whether indirect effects of internationalisation affect the domestic supply chain. Micro-level data for manufacturing firms across 19 EU countries, combined with input-output tables, show that domestic access to intermediate inputs that are also exported leads to higher levels of efficiency.

Tomohiko Inui, Keiko Ito, Daisuke Miyakawa, 09 November 2017

Economists have recently tried to identify why some firms survive longer than others in export markets. This column examines the firm-level determinants of the duration of Japanese manufacturing firms’ exporting. It suggests that the degree to which products are differentiated matters for firms’ survivability, and that policies to support R&D activities thus indirectly contribute to increasing firms’ chances of survival in foreign markets.

Kaoru Hosono, Daisuke Miyakawa, Miho Takizawa, 27 August 2015

‘Learning by exporting’ refers to productivity gains experienced by firms after they commence exporting. Such gains are argued to be due to access to new knowledge and resources. This column explores some of the preconditions for learning-by-exporting effects, using data on the overseas activities and affiliations of Japanese firms. Firms that enter markets in which they don’t have affiliates or subsidiaries are found to enjoy the most learning-by-exporting productivity gains. These findings have implications for the timing of new market entry.

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