Nirosha Elsem Varghese, Iryna Sabat, Sebastian Neumann-Böhme, Jonas Schreyögg, Tom Stargardt, Aleksandra Torbica, Job van Exel, Pedro Barros, Werner Brouwer, 26 October 2020

The World Health Organization recommended a range of preventative behaviours to protect the public from COVID-19. This column examines how familiar and compliant the adult population of seven European countries were with WHO’s recommendations. Using individual-level data from 7,000 respondents to an online survey conducted in April 2020, the study finds that information from WHO in the context of COVID-19 was well trusted and largely followed, with heterogeneities by recommendation type, country, and individual level characteristics such as region, age, gender, and education. 

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You are invited to a CEPR / LSE IGA / SPP webinar on:

Do we have the WHO we need?
Global Health Governance and Reform

Join us on Thursday 25 June 2020
13:30-15:00 (BST, London), 14:30 - 16:00 (CST)

As debates about the future of the World Health Organization rage on, the Covid-19 pandemic is a reminder of the vital importance of global public health institutions. What lessons can we draw from the current pandemic from WHO’s performance and previous efforts to reform it? What principles should guide WHO’s missions and tools to deal with pandemics? Could reforms centre around having a narrower mission and creating better incentives to prevent contagions from spreading globally using stronger legal and financial tools? How can we achieve better coordination among the many diverse actors on the global health stage?

Join Lucie Gadenne, Maitreesh Ghatak, Rebecca Katz, Clare Wenham and Erik Berglöf in this webinar discussion.

Register: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/9115928366838/WN_P7UzTY6sTRaYPZ...

Lucie Gadenne, Maitreesh Ghatak, 30 May 2020

As debates about the future of the World Health Organization rage on, the Covid-19 pandemic is a reminder of the vital importance of global public health institutions. This column considers what principles should guide WHO’s missions and tools to deal with pandemics, which are distinguished from other health risks by their high contagion, extreme potential outcomes in terms of mortality risk, and the ‘weak-link’ aspect of global collective action. It argues that reforms should centre around having a narrower mission – Global Response to Infectious Diseases, or GRID – and creating better incentives to prevent contagions from spreading globally using stronger legal and financial tools. 

Olivier Sterck, Max Roser, Mthuli Ncube, Stefan Thewissen, 16 February 2018

Large multilateral organisations like WHO and the UN rely heavily on average income data in determining eligibility for, and the allocation of, development assistance for health. This column tests this paradigm by analysing the determinants of health outcomes for 99 countries. A country’s epidemiological surroundings, poverty gap, and institutional capacity appear to be much better predictors of health outcomes than gross national income. These findings suggest alternative metrics that could be leveraged in allocating development assistance for health.

Erick Gong, 25 May 2016

Individuals getting tested for HIV are expected to reduce their risky sexual behaviour. In this video, Erick Gong discusses the impact of HIV testing and expectations about the test results on risky sexual behaviour. The number of people being HIV tested is increasing, and understanding how individuals react to is important to adapt policies to treat the virus. This video was recorded in March 2016 during the Royal Economic Society’s Annual Conference held at the University of Sussex.

David Bloom, Michael Kuhn, Klaus Prettner, 09 October 2015

There has been lots of discussion about economic growth in developing countries, improved health, and the link between health and growth. But does it matter whether it is men’s or women’s health that is improved? This column argues that it does – targeting health investments on women rather than on men is a strong lever for development policy.

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