Olivier Sterck, Max Roser, Mthuli Ncube, Stefan Thewissen, 16 February 2018

Large multilateral organisations like WHO and the UN rely heavily on average income data in determining eligibility for, and the allocation of, development assistance for health. This column tests this paradigm by analysing the determinants of health outcomes for 99 countries. A country’s epidemiological surroundings, poverty gap, and institutional capacity appear to be much better predictors of health outcomes than gross national income. These findings suggest alternative metrics that could be leveraged in allocating development assistance for health.

Erick Gong, 25 May 2016

Individuals getting tested for HIV are expected to reduce their risky sexual behaviour. In this video, Erick Gong discusses the impact of HIV testing and expectations about the test results on risky sexual behaviour. The number of people being HIV tested is increasing, and understanding how individuals react to is important to adapt policies to treat the virus. This video was recorded in March 2016 during the Royal Economic Society’s Annual Conference held at the University of Sussex.

David Bloom, Michael Kuhn, Klaus Prettner, 09 October 2015

There has been lots of discussion about economic growth in developing countries, improved health, and the link between health and growth. But does it matter whether it is men’s or women’s health that is improved? This column argues that it does – targeting health investments on women rather than on men is a strong lever for development policy.

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