Timothy Hatton, 15 July 2011

Tim Hatton of the Australian National University talks to Viv Davies about his book on asylum policy, which assesses what asylum policies have achieved and argues that policy towards asylum seekers should be based on historical insight, quantitative evidence and a realistic view of the political economy of asylum policy. Hatton presents the case for a fully integrated Europe-wide asylum policy. The interview was recorded on 13 July 2011. [Also read the transcript.]

Ian Goldin, 03 June 2011

Ian Goldin, director of the Oxford Martin School at the University of Oxford, talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about his new book, ‘Exceptional People’, co-authored with Geoffrey Cameron and Meera Balarajan. They discuss how migrants have fuelled human progress over centuries, the benefits for sending and receiving countries, and why pressure from both demand and supply could lead to a doubling of cross-border migration flows over the next few years. The interview was recorded in Oxford in May 2011. [Also read the transcript.]

Assaf Razin, Jackline Wahba, 04 March 2011

Do immigrants just move for the benefit systems? This column argues that the effect of the welfare state on immigration and its composition depends on whether the destination country's migration policy is “free” or “managed”, and on whether the source country is developed or developing.

Emmanuel Saez, Henrik Kleven, Camille Landais, 06 January 2011

This month some of Europe’s most skilled footballers will switch clubs in deals worth millions of euros. This column analyses the movement of Europe’s footballers between the top 14 leagues and finds that a major influence on player decisions to move is the difference in the tax regime – with policy implications going well beyond the football pitch.

Bernard Hoekman, Çağlar Özden, 02 January 2011

High unemployment among the young and low skilled is fuelling anti-immigration sentiments across the OECD. This column argues that, in Western Europe, demographic trends are such that demand for many workers will exceed supply. It proposes a framework that enables the temporary movement of services providers, a policy that could address Europe’s labour needs while placating public resistance.

John Gibson, David McKenzie, 13 November 2010

The debate over immigration often highlights the effects on the native population. This column instead looks at the country that immigrants leave behind. It presents a multi-year evaluation of New Zealand’s seasonal migration programme. In its first two years, the main developing countries supplying workers to the programme have seen a large improvement in household wellbeing.

Assaf Razin, 06 November 2010

The growing voice of skilled workers and the retired in industrialised countries is calling out for politicians to further restrict immigration in order to allay fears of stealing jobs and scrounging off benefits. This column explores the political process behind constraints to migration and describes the importance of cross-country coordination in a post-crisis world of ageing generous welfare states.

Francesco D'Amuri, Giovanni Peri, 31 October 2010

Several studies find that immigrants do not harm the wages and job prospects of native workers. This column seeks to explain these somewhat counterintuitive findings by emphasizing the scope for complementarities between foreign-born and native workers. Examining 14 European countries from 1996 to 2007, it finds that immigrants often supply manual skills, leaving native workers to take up jobs that require more complex skills – even boosting demand for them. Immigrants replace “tasks”, not workers.

William Kerr, William Lincoln, 15 July 2010

How does high-skilled immigration affect innovation in receiving countries? This column examines how large fluctuations in the admissions levels of H-1B visa holders between 1995 and 2008 influenced US patenting. It suggests higher H-1B admissions increased US innovation through the direct contributions of the immigrants without crowding out those of natives.

Fabrizio Coricelli, 01 May 2010

Why have emerging economies weathered the crisis better than advanced countries? This column summarises a session given by Alan Winters, Saul Estrin, Thorsten Beck, and organised by Nauro Campos at the Royal Economic Society annual conference in March 2010. The contributions argue that the crisis may have long-lasting effects on migration, foreign direct investment, and financial development in Africa.

Katherine Eriksson, Leah Boustan, Ran Abramitzky, 18 February 2010

The Age of Mass Migration (1850-1913) was one of the largest migration episodes in history. Unlike today, during this era the US maintained an open border. This column suggests that, unhindered by entry restrictions, Europeans migrants to the US during this period were more likely to be workers with lower-productivity and poorer economic prospects.

Demetrios Papademetriou, 04 December 2009

Demetrios Papademetriou, president and co-founder of the Migration Policy Institute in Washington DC, talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about the key elements of wise migration policy both at a time of economic crisis and for the longer term. The interview was recorded at the Global Economic Symposium in Schleswig-Holstein in September 2009.

Christian Dustmann, Tommaso Frattini, Caroline Halls, 08 August 2009

Are new immigrants a fiscal burden on incumbent residents? This column looks at Eastern European immigrants in the UK and shows that they are net contributors to public finances because they have a higher labour force participation rate, are likely to pay more in indirect taxes like VAT, and make much lower use of benefits and public services.

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This 3 day conference at St Catherine's College, Oxford University hosts speakers from Oxford, LSE, UCL, World Bank brings together many of the new and emerging themes in the economics of welfare. Theory tracks focus on social choice and welfare, and other related aspects of welfare economic theory and public economics. Empirical/applied tracks focus on policy areas including health, development, social policy, environment, education, poverty reduction, non-monetary measures of economic progress etc. Papers on applied econometrics or experimental work relevant to welfare economic theory and assumptions about human behaviour also welcome.

Louis Putterman, David Weil, 13 December 2008

This column introduces a five century migration matrix indicating the 1500 countries of residence of ancestors of each country’s current population. The power of regional origins is illustrated by the fact that 44% of the variance in 2000 per capita GDPs is accounted for by the share of the population’s ancestors that lived in Europe in 1500.

Anzelika Zaiceva, Klaus F. Zimmermann, 28 July 2008

The authors of CEPR DP6921 look at migration within the EU, before and after the 2004 enlargement. In particular, they assess the scale and drivers of migration, and the composition of the migrants before the enlargement, and look at how this has changed post-enlargement.

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The school intends to provide an intensive training course for Ph.D. students and young researchers who are working in the fields of international economics and development.

Timothy Hatton, 07 April 2008

Across the EU, new asylum applications have fallen dramatically, which some governments attribute to their policy changes. New research shows that tougher policies are indeed deterring asylum seekers, though perhaps less than government ministers would like to claim.

L Alan Winters, 11 December 2007

Migration matters and will matter more as the lopsidedness of the world age-profile works its way through into labour and product markets. Surprisingly, there has been no global dataset on migration stocks until now. A new CEPR Policy Insight introduces the new database maintained at the University of Sussex.

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