Prachi Mishra, 16 June 2016

All monetary policies have external spillover effects. However, the domestic mandates of most central banks may not legally allow them to take spillovers into account, and may force them to undertake aggressive policies so long as they have some small positive domestic effect. This column looks at the rules of the game for responsible policy in such a context. It proposes a ‘traffic light’ system to identify policies that should be encouraged by the international community, policies that should be used temporarily and with care, and policies that should be avoided at all costs.

Piotr Danisewicz, Dennis Reinhardt, Rhiannon Sowerbutts, 05 March 2015

In a global financial system, macroprudential policies may create international spillovers. This column presents new evidence on how the organisational structure of a bank affects the magnitude of these spillovers. An increase in capital requirements at home causes foreign branches to reduce their lending growth to other banks operating in the UK more than foreign subsidiaries do. Seemingly, this is because branches are an integral part of the parent company.

Michael Bordo, 17 December 2007

There is a strong tendency in the media and policy circles to view each crisis as totally new and unexpected. Financial crises, however, are as old as financial markets. Here are the lessons drawn by one of the world’s leading economic historians of financial crises.

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