Catherine Maclean, Justine Mallatt, Christopher J. Ruhm, Kosali Simon, 20 December 2020

Opioid misuse in the US is estimated to cost over $500 billion annually, with fatalities from opioid overdoses exceeding the American death count from the Vietnam War. This column examines the causes and consequences of the opioid crisis, based on a review of more than 100 economic studies. Policies such as prescription drug monitoring programmes, pill mill laws, prescribing limits, and doctor-shopping laws reduce opioid prescribing. However, their effects may be more limited in environments where many have already become addicted to opioids. 

Janet Currie, 15 January 2016

Studies of the effects of economic fluctuations on health have come to wildly different conclusions. This may be because the effects are different for different groups. Using US data, this column looks at the health consequences of the Great Recession on mothers, a sub-population that has thus far been largely neglected in the literature. Increases in unemployment are found to have large negative health effects and to increase incidences of smoking and substance abuse among mothers. These effects appear to be concentrated on disadvantaged groups such as minorities, and point to short- and long-term consequences for their children.

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