Dennis Essers, Francesco Grigoli, Evgenia Pugacheva, 04 September 2020

Knowledge and ideas – spread, among other channels, through the publication of research papers – are considered key contributing factors to economic growth. In recent years, research papers have increasingly been produced through collaborations among researchers. This column presents evidence on the importance of network effects for starting and maintaining research collaborations. Based on the IMF working papers co-authorship network, it finds that researchers closer to each other are significantly more likely to collaborate. Hence, incentives aimed at connecting researchers and spurring collaborations are likely to result in more dynamic knowledge generation, in turn promoting economic growth.

Lukas Kuld, John O'Hagan, 16 December 2017

Many theories have been posited for the growth in co-authorship in economic research output. This column uses new findings to assess the viability of the different explanations. Lower costs of global communication and increased pressure to produce greater research output play a role, but more information on hiring, promotional, and funding practices is required to assess the relative importance of the various factors behind the trend.

Co-Pierre Georg, Michael E. Rose, 16 January 2016

Informal collaboration is an integral part of academia. Studies of academic collaboration have mostly focused on formal collaboration, as measured by co-authorships. This column instead constructs a network of informal collaboration in financial economics, exploiting acknowledgements of assistance appearing in published papers. Three rankings of financial economists are constructed based on acknowledgement occurrence and centrality. Being helpful is not found to predict centrality in the informal collaboration network.

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