Pauline Grosjean, 09 September 2019

How did WWII shape our views about the state, and about each other? This column, part of a Vox debate on the economics of WWII, uses individual-level data from more than 35,000 individuals in 35 countries to shed light on how wartime victimisation has shaped political and social preferences in the long run. Personal or family exposure to war violence has left a negative and enduring imprint on levels of political trust throughout Europe and Central Asia, regardless of the outcome or nature of the conflict.  It also spurred collective action, but of a dark nature – one associated with further erosion of social and political trust.

Mark Harrison, Alan Bollard, Walter Scheidel, Cormac Ó Gráda, 06 September 2019

Marking the 80th anniversary of the outbreak of the Second World War, some of the authors involved in VoxEU's series, The Economics of the Second World War: Eighty Years On, talk to Tim Phillips about their research.

Giovanni Federico, Antonio Tena-Junguito, 07 February 2016

Parallels are often drawn between the Great Recession of the past decade and the economic turmoil of the interwar period. In terms of global trade, these comparisons are based on obsolete and incomplete data. This column re-estimates world trade since the beginning of the 19th century using a new database. The effect of the Great Recession on trade growth is sizeable but fairly small compared with the joint effect of the two world wars and the Great Depression. However, the effects will become more and more comparable if the current trade stagnation continues.

Events

CEPR Policy Research