Diane Coyle, 03 December 2011

Have economists been asleep at the wheel? This column reports from a conference on the psychology and economics of ‘scarce attention’. Among the ideas discussed is whether too much information can blind decision-making and whether this can explain why so many economists missed the warning signs of a crisis.

Riccardo Puglisi, James Snyder, 01 September 2011

Is the US media biased? According to a controversial new book, it is – and, perhaps surprisingly, to the left. This column takes a different analytical approach and argues that the press is actually much closer to the average voter’s sentiments than we might think. Might all these claims that the media is biased in one direction or the other be adding a whole new set of distortions?

Michael Ehrmann, Marcel Fratzscher, Benjamin Born, 29 November 2010

In response to the financial crisis, many central banks are receiving significant new responsibilities for macroprudential supervision. Exploiting the experience of central banks with Financial Stability Reports and other financial stability-related statements, this column argues that such central bank communication can be highly effective, in particular during periods of financial stress.

Esther Duflo, 03 January 2008

High quality empirical evidence from the shows that mass media influences voters but it is not clear that the media imparts a bias. It could be that improving access to any media informs voters and prompts them to turn against an embattled incumbent.

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