Emmanuel Saez, Benjamin Schoefer, David Seim, 22 November 2017

Cuts to the employer portion of payroll taxes are often discussed as a policy lever to reduce labour costs for firms. This column examines the effects of a Swedish experiment which dramatically cut employer payroll taxes for young workers between 2007 and 2015. The tax cut reduced youth unemployment by 2-3 percentage points, without any differential increase in wages of young workers. Firms used the tax windfall to expand employment and business activity, and firms with larger tax windfalls raised wages for workers – both young and old – collectively.

Wouter den Haan, Martin Ellison, Ethan Ilzetzki, Michael McMahon, Ricardo Reis, 31 March 2016

A new National Living Wage (NLW) replaces the UK’s National Minimum Wage from April. This column reports the views of leading experts on its likely effects on employment, wages, and prices. A majority of respondents in the monthly Centre for Macroeconomics survey believe that the NLW will not lead to significantly lower employment; similarly, a majority of respondents believe that the NLW will only have a muted effect on wages and prices. The key unknown for many in considering the overall economic impact of the NLW is how quickly the UK economy will grow over the coming years.

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