Michael Stolpe, 22 March 2013

The crisis has shot holes in government budgets devoted to pro-growth public goods. This column argues that health-related public goods support long-term economic growth. Governments may be more inclined to focus on spending related directly to jobs, such as education and welfare-to-work programmes, but health should not be forgotten

John Driffill, 08 March 2013

How do we solve worryingly high unemployment across Europe? In a time of crisis, would reform actually exacerbate unemployment? This column argues that labour markets – especially in southern Europe – have to be reformed, presenting policy prescriptions to that effect. If we are to break the back of sluggish labour markets, policymakers need to learn from Europe’s success stories.

Willem Thorbecke, 26 February 2013

Policymakers everywhere are concerned about currency wars. Are quantitative easing and managed exchange rates bad for the global economy? This column looks at the hard empirical evidence, arguing that, in fact, Japan is behaving rather responsibly and that other strong economies have themselves benefited from undervalued currencies. That said, it is true that politicians’ short time horizons often lead to stealthy policy and large swings in exchange rates. Economists should therefore aim to promote longer-run cosmopolitan interests rather than shorter-run nationalistic agendas where possible.

Jacob Kirkegaard, 13 October 2012

Youth unemployment in the Eurozone looks like a social and economic disaster in the making – 30%, 40%, even 50% of young people sitting on their hands instead of building skills and experience. This column argues the headline numbers are misleading. While youth unemployment is a serious problem, a large share of EZ youth are not in the labour force, so the headline figures overstate the labour-market ‘scar tissue’ that will be left over from the crisis.

Hans Holter, Indraneel Chakraborty, Serhiy Stepanchuk, 18 May 2012

It is no secret that Americans work more than Europeans – 30% more according to recent studies. Many economists point to higher taxes in Europe as a major cause. This column suggests that divorce rates also play a role, particularly for women's labour supply.

Lucrezia Reichlin, Domenico Giannone, Jasper McMahon, Saverio Simonelli, 02 May 2012

According to official statistics, the UK and Europe are heading for recession, while the US is recovering. This has led some to suggest that European economies are moving in the opposite direction to the US. This column, written by the co-founders of Now-Casting, presents new now-casting estimates that put Europe and the US even further apart.

Stefan Tangermann, 10 November 2011

As Europe battles a life-threatening crisis, the European Commission has found time to discuss the much-maligned Common Agricultural Policy. This column, by the former OECD Director for Trade and Agriculture, argues that far from seizing the opportunity to use CAP to benefit fiscal discipline, policymakers are maintaining an outdated and inefficient system for the financial benefit of farmers.

Moshe Hazan, Hosny Zoabi, 03 October 2011

What is the relationship between women's education, income, and family size? CEPR DP8590 presents new evidence from the US in support of the 'marketization hypothesis' -- that women's increased labour-force participation allows them to buy market services to raise their families. Highly educated American women substitute much of their own time with nannying and housekeeping services, which enables them to have more children and work longer hours.

John Muellbauer, Keiko Murata, 21 August 2011

The global crisis of 2008-2009 has refocused attention on the lessons of Japan’s lost decade, with many suggesting that Europe and the US are heading the same direction. This makes a thorough understanding of the Japanese case an urgent matter. But this column argues that pushing the analogies too far is a mistake that could prolong the economic pain.

Hans-Joachim Voth, Jacopo Ponticelli, 09 August 2011

In the wake of this week's London riots, some commentators have linked the youth unrest to budget cuts. The authors of CEPR DP8513 explore the historical basis for this view and find that austerity and violence have tended to go hand in hand.

Thorsten Beck, Wolf Wagner, Philip Lane, Dirk Schoenmaker, Elena Carletti, Franklin Allen, 20 June 2011

This CEPR report argues that policy reforms in micro- and macro-prudential regulation and macroeconomic policies are needed for Europe to reap the important diversification and efficiency benefits from cross-border banking, while reducing the risks stemming from large cross-border banks.

Hans-Joachim Voth, Nico Voigtländer, 29 July 2009

In modern economic thinking, peace and prosperity go hand in hand. However, there are good reasons why in pre-modern societies, the opposite relationship held true – war, disease, and urban death spelled high incomes. This column explains why Europe’s rise to riches in the early modern period owed much to exceptionally bellicose international politics, urban overcrowding, and frequent epidemics.

Andrew Oswald, 24 January 2009

This column measures the quality of university economics research in Europe and the UK by concentrating on within-journal rankings of influential articles. The UK and Europe are doing relatively well, and top-level research output is not concentrated at half a dozen world-famous institutions. Science-funding policies by European governments should reflect this diversity.

Yishay Maoz, Matthias Doepke, Moshe Hazan, 08 September 2008

Europe faces a fertility crisis, but not for the first time. The 1930s saw a similar situation but fertility recovered in the 1950s. This column assesses the historical lessons. The news is not good. Recent research shows that the post-war baby boom happened because young women were denied opportunities in the labour market due to discrimination and competition with older women who acquired job experience during the war.

Anzelika Zaiceva, Klaus F. Zimmermann, 28 July 2008

The authors of CEPR DP6921 look at migration within the EU, before and after the 2004 enlargement. In particular, they assess the scale and drivers of migration, and the composition of the migrants before the enlargement, and look at how this has changed post-enlargement.

Maarten Bosker, Eltjo Buringh, Jan Luiten van Zanden, 28 June 2008

Baghdad was a wonder of the world in the year 800 while London was an economic backwater. By 1800, London was the largest city in the world while Arab cities languished. Recent research attributes this ‘trading places’ to institutional differences: Arab cities were tied to the fate of the state while European cities were independent growth poles.

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EU Member States and the European Commission often assert that the EU's multiple trade preference schemes are a concrete manifestation of Europe's commitment to the development of poorer nations through trade. But what do we really know about the impact of these measures? Do they actually affect developing countries evenly? By how much? In this presentation Simon Evenett will provide a comprehensive yet accessible overview of the empirical findings concerning the operation of the EU's trade preference schemes. WIth a discussion grounded in the evidence base, he will assess if there is a gap between European aspirations and the outcomes on the ground. Implications will be drawn for European trade and development policies in general, including those initiatives associated with the Doha Round.

Nikolaus Wolf, 29 May 2008

Prior to 1914, Europe was economically integrated across political borders. The “second Thirty Year War” (1914-1945) put up barriers that post-war European integration has been undoing since the 1950s, returning Europe to a familiar state of economic affairs.

Andreas Freytag, 19 May 2008

Europeans are now echoing American concerns about China’s trade surplus. This column argues that there is little reason to worry about Europe’s trade deficit with China nor evidence that China should be pressed to revalue the renminbi.

Thomas Philippon, Nicolas Véron, 22 February 2008

The corporate giants of Europe are aging elders. This column suggests financial reforms to encourage the growth of emerging enterprises.

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