Elisabeth Falck, Mathias Hoffmann, Patrick Hürtgen, 06 November 2017

Existing theoretical and empirical evidence suggests that less expansionary monetary policies lead to lower inflation and dampened inflation expectations. This column considers how the dispersion of inflation expectations can affect this relationship. The results show that an increase in the policy rate can give rise to higher inflation in the short run if professional inflation forecasts differ widely. These findings highlight the importance of considering the amount of agreement about inflation expectations in monetary policy decision-making.

Martín Gonzalez-Eiras, Dirk Niepelt, 11 October 2016

The US fiscal system underwent a radical transformation in the 1930s. This column proposes a micro-founded general equilibrium model that blends politics and macroeconomics to explain the transformation. It rationalises tax centralisation and intergovernmental grants as the equilibrium response to the Sixteenth Amendment, which introduced federal taxation. The theory can also be used to forecast federal and regional taxes and government spending.

Ivan Lopez Cruz, Sebastian Galiani, Gustavo Torrens, 24 May 2016

A large empirical literature has revealed the effects of preventative and punitive measures on crime. This column examines the effects of police deployment strategies, comparing geographically concentrated protection with evenly dispersed protection across a city. The results suggests that when considering changes in the geographic distribution of police forces, we should take into account the effects on house prices and on reallocation of the population, as well as the overall effect on crime in the entire city. 

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