Vyacheslav Fos, Naser Hamdi, Ankit Kalda, Jordan Nickerson, 29 March 2020

The growth of the gig economy has renewed debates about how to regulate employers who provide neither health insurance nor social security benefits to their employees. Using a combination of Uber product launch dates and employee-level data on job separations, this column finds that employees who are laid off from their formal occupations but have access to Uber are less likely to rely on unemployment insurance. Instead, gig labour provides a safety net as they search for more permanent work in the formal market.

David Autor, 15 July 2017

What could the government do to mitigate the effects of trade shocks? In this video, David Autor explains the implications of various insurance programmes. This video was recorded at the Institute for Fiscal Studies in June 2017.

Andrew Ellul, Marco Pagano, Fabiano Schivardi, 17 June 2016

Most countries feature some form of government-provided unemployment insurance, but there is an alternative provider of insurance for employees – the firm they work for. This column asks whether the provision of implicit insurance by family firms in particular to employees is a substitute for the provision of explicit insurance by governments. Family firms stabilise employment more than non-family firms, and their insurance provision is greater when the insurance provided by the public sector is less generous.

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