Taiji Inui, Wataru Takahashi, Mamoru Ishida, 16 October 2020

Central bank digital currencies are currently being considered by many central banks around the world. This column advocates the introduction of an Asian digital common currency as a multilateral synthetic currency comparable to the euro. It argues that the benefits it would bring – such as a deepening cooperation within multilateral frameworks and the protection of the rights of small and medium-sized countries – are greater than the disadvantages of inefficiencies in multilateral frameworks. 

Felix Roth, Lars Jonung, Felicitas Nowak-Lehmann, 11 November 2016

The euro as a common currency has recently been the subject of harsh criticism by economists from both sides of the Atlantic, including claims that citizens in some Eurozone countries are turning against it. This column argues that, in fact, the euro currently enjoys comfortable popular support in each of the 12 original member states of the Eurozone and that potential upcoming referenda in any of these countries do not appear to pose a threat to the currency. In contrast, popular support for the euro has declined sharply in non-Eurozone EU member states since the recent crisis, with the UK standing out as the country with the most negative view. 

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