Alejandro Justiniano, Giorgio Primiceri, Andrea Tambalotti, 31 October 2017

The US witnessed an unprecedented boom in mortgage debt and house prices in the early 2000s, which precipitated the crisis in 2007. This column documents a sudden, large and persistent fall in the spread of mortgage over Treasury rates in the summer of 2003. It argues that the emergence of this ‘conundrum’ marked a crucial turning point in the dynamics of the boom, with the resulting easier credit conditions in the subprime market in particular leading to the origination of mortgages that defaulted progressively more frequently down the road.

Fredrik Andersson, Lars Jonung, 30 May 2016

The volume of credit to Swedish households has grown twice as fast as incomes since the mid-1990s. This has resulted in both rising house prices and rising household debt. This column argues that these trends expose Sweden to important economic vulnerabilities. Curbing these vulnerabilities will require prompt action by the authorities.

Gary Gorton, Guillermo Ordoñez, 27 March 2016

Credit booms are not rare and usually precede financial crises. However, some end in a crisis while others do not. This column argues that credit booms start with an increase in productivity, which subsequently falls much faster during ‘bad booms’. When this decline is severe enough, it changes the informational regime in credit markets, leading to a drying up of credit. A crisis may be the result of an exhausted credit boom and not necessarily of a negative productivity shock. 

Giovanni Dell'Ariccia, Deniz Igan, Luc Laeven, 04 February 2008

Over the last decade, the market for mortgage-backed securities has expanded dramatically, evolving from a small niche segment to a major portion of the overall U.S. mortgage market. The authors of CEPR DP6683 study the relationship between this recent boom and current delinquencies in the subprime mortgage market. Specifically, they analyze the extent to which this relationship can be explained by a decline in credit standards and excessive risk taking by lenders that is unrelated to improvements in underlying economic fundamentals.

Events

CEPR Policy Research