Panicos Demetriades, 21 February 2018

Europe’s new framework for resolving banks includes a ‘bail-in’ mechanism that aims to ensure that banks’ shareholders and creditors pay their share of costs, and which was first used to resolve the 2013 banking crisis in Cyprus. This column, written by the economist who was the country’s central bank governor at the time, examines the unintended consequences of the bail-in, which have proved more toxic than could ever have been imagined, and not just in Cyprus. Several euro area central banks and their governors have found themselves in the eye of political and legal storms when taking actions to resolve failing banks and/or restore stability in their banking systems.

Martin Brown, Ioanna S Evangelou, Helmut Stix, 01 February 2018

A cornerstone of new bank resolution policies across the world is the introduction of bail-ins to redistribute the costs of bank failures from taxpayers to bank creditors. This column uses the bail-in of two banks in Cyprus to examine how bank depositors react to this way of resolving a crisis. In the short run, customers who experienced deposit or bond bail-ins increased their holdings of cash and reduced deposits, while those who faced only an equity bail-in did not change their behaviour. In the medium run, confidence in the banking system among all depositors remained low.

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Instructors: Christos Gortsos (National and Kapodistrian University of Athens and EUI – Fernand Braudel Senior Fellow), Seraina Grünewald (University of Zurich)
Area: Bank Regulation, Supervision and Resolution
Level: Introductory/Intermediate

This course introduces the concept of bank resolution and its main attributes. Then, it presents the EU framework governing resolution of credit institutions, the provisions on the Single Resolution Fund under the SRM Regulation and the related Intergovernmental Agreement.

At the end of this course, which is open to non-economists, participants will have acquired thorough knowledge on:
- The main elements of the international and the EU regulatory framework on resolution.
- The sale of business, bridge institution, asset separation, bail-in.
- The conditions for resolution.
- The alternative forms of permissible state aid under the new framework.

Thomas Philippon, Aude Salord, 22 March 2017

Failed financial firms should not be bailed out by the taxpayers. Europe, unfortunately, has a weak track record of following this principle of good governance and sound economic policy. The banking union, with its new approach to supervision and resolution, is meant to improve this matter. This column introduces a new Geneva Special Report on the World Economy which reviews the resolution side of the banking union. 

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