Taylor Jaworski, Carl Kitchens, Sergey Nigai, 01 November 2020

The interaction between domestic transportation networks, market integration, and globalisation is important for understanding the value of domestic infrastructure investment and weighing these against the substantial costs of building and maintaining domestic roads. Using an endogenous specification of domestic and international trade costs that takes into account the availability of the road network and congestion levels, this column estimates that the total value of the entire US highway system was $619 billion in 2012 dollars, which accounts for 3.9% of US aggregate GDP in 2012. The results suggest that decisions on how much to invest in domestic infrastructure should be made in conjunction with considering how improvements in the domestic transportation networks would affect domestic and international trade as well as distributional consequences for different locations within a country.

Riccardo Crescenzi, Marco Di Cataldo, Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, 11 April 2017

Transport infrastructure investment is a cornerstone of growth-promoting strategies around the world. However, investment in new infrastructure is not always conducive to stronger economic performance. This column argues that the lack of positive economic returns may be due to institutional failures mitigating the growth effects of public capital expenditures. In contexts marked by weak and inefficient governments and widespread corruption, different types of road investments yield low or no economic returns.

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