Sebastian Edwards, 10 November 2020

While today almost every advanced nation has a flexible exchange rate regime similar to that advocated by Milton Friedman, most emerging countries continue to have ‘conventional peg’. This column draws on the historical work of Milton Friedman to examine the conditions under which he thought that flexible rates were the right system for developing countries, and when he thought that it was appropriate to have an alternative regime. 

Neil Monnery, 30 June 2017

Post-war Hong Kong delivered one of the most dramatic improvements in living standards in history, a transformation regarded by Milton Friedman as an experiment in the potential impact of economic freedom on economic growth. This column assesses the contribution of one key official – finance minister Sir John Cowperthwaite – whose laissez-faire approach of ‘positive non-interventionism’, much admired by Friedman, underpinned that success. It also explores, 20 years on from the handover to China, whether a second stage of the Hong Kong economic experiment might be in progress, perhaps leading to faltering freedom and faltering growth.

Neil Ericsson, David Hendry, Stedman Hood, 04 May 2017

When empirically modelling the US demand for money, Milton Friedman more than doubled the observed initial stock of money to account for a “changing degree of financial sophistication” in the US relative to the UK. This column discusses effects of this adjustment on Friedman’s empirical models. His data adjustment dramatically reduced apparent movements in the velocity of circulation of money, and it adversely affected the constancy and fit of his estimated money demand models. 

CEPR Policy Research