Kacie Dragan, Ingrid Gould Ellen, Sherry Glied, 19 September 2019

The pace of gentrification in US cities has accelerated, but little evidence exists on its impact on low-income children. This column uses Medicaid claims data to examine how gentrification affects children’s health and wellbeing in New York City. It finds that low-income children born in areas that gentrify are no more likely to move than those born in areas that don't gentrify, and those that do move tend to end up living in areas of lower poverty. Moreover, gentrification does not appear to dramatically alter the health status or health-system utilisation of children by age 9–11, although children growing up in gentrifying areas show somewhat elevated levels of anxiety and depression.

Edward Glaeser, 02 April 2019

Edward Glaeser of Harvard University investigates how Yelp data can be used when official data are not yet available, particularly in predicting gentrification.

Kristian Behrens, Brahim Boualam, Julien Martin, Florian Mayneris, 31 January 2019

Urban planners are increasingly willing to adopt policies to temper neighbourhood changes and to assist potential losers from these changes, but how can future spots of gentrification be anticipated? This column studies gentrification in New York and Philadelphia between 1990 and 2010 to provide evidence on the micro-geographic scale of the process and the role that businesses play in it. It identifies a small group of about 20 industries whose presence in a poor neighbourhood increases its likelihood of gentrifying.

David Autor, Christopher Palmer, Parag Pathak, 16 November 2017

Separating cause from effect is notoriously difficult when it comes to gentrification and neighbourhood amenities, including public safety. This column exploits the sudden ending of a rent control regime in Cambridge, MA to examine whether and by how much gentrification affects crime. In the years immediately following the end of rent control, crime fell significantly more in neighbourhoods that had been heavily rent controlled. But those neighbourhoods also saw the highest turnover in occupants, suggesting that incumbent renters in these areas were priced out of their properties and thus missed out on the benefits from gentrification.

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