Maria Chiara Cavalleri, Alice Eliet, Peter McAdam, Filippos Petroulakis, Ana Soares, Isabel Vansteenkiste, 24 August 2019

Recent evidence suggests that competitive intensity has been declining in the US. This column aims to contribute to our understanding of these trends in the euro area. It finds that, in contrast to the situation in the US, market power metrics have been relatively stable over recent years and mark-ups have marginally been trending down since the late 1990s. It suggests that more research on the sectoral level and with better data is necessary to analyse the complex welfare and policy implications of these developments.

Meghana Ayyagari, Asli Demirgüç-Kunt, Vojislav Maksimovic, 08 October 2018

The emergence of ‘superstar’ firms that achieve vastly better returns on invested capital have led to concern that some sectors are too concentrated. The column argues that this difference in returns can be accounted for by better measurement of intangible capital. These firms may not be exercising market power in ways that harm consumers in the short run, but policymakers should ensure that markets remain contestable.

David Baqaee, Emmanuel Farhi, 04 December 2017

Mounting evidence suggests that average mark-ups in the US economy have been increasing. This column argues that about half of measured aggregate productivity growth over the last 20 years can be accounted for by firms with higher mark-ups increasing their relative size. This implies that the slowdown in pure technology growth is even slower than suggested by aggregate productivity statistics. Eliminating mark-ups would increase the productivity of the US economy by about 40%.

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