Jean Lacroix, 17 June 2020

Last December, the US House of Representatives passed a bill to restore some of the provisions of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which had been nullified in a 2013 Supreme Court decision. This column exploits variation resulting from the Act’s coverage formula to show that the Act decreased violence by both pro-segregationists and anti-segregationists, particularly before elections. The passing of the Act in 1965 thus appears to offer an example from US history of enfranchisement curbing political violence.

Graziella Bertocchi, Arcangelo Dimico, Francesco Lancia, Alessia Russo, 07 December 2017

Voter turnout in modern democracies tends to be lowest among the young, and politicians are likely to be less responsive to their demands as a result. This column focuses on preregistration, a reform aimed at facilitating voter registration among young Americans. Examining the link between the political participation of various age groups and policy decisions, it shows that adopting preregistration has shifted government spending toward higher education and increased student financial aid, and has promoted an episode of youth enfranchisement.

Events

CEPR Policy Research