Georg Duernecker, Berthold Herrendorf, 01 May 2018

Recent research has shown that, in contrast to the prediction of basic theory, income tax increases in OECD countries have led people to spend less time working and more time on leisure activities, with little change in hours of household work. This column uses new estimates of household productivity to resolve the discrepancy between the evidence and basic theory. The OECD countries in which governments increased income taxes also tended to experience increases in the productivity of household production.

Michael Bar, Moshe Hazan, Oksana Leukhina, David Weiss, Hosny Zoabi, 13 January 2018

Over recent decades, the trend for high-skilled, career-focused women to have fewer children, if any at all, has reversed. Using US data, this column shows that rising wage inequality is behind the reversal. Greater income inequality enables high-income families to outsource household production to lower-income people. Changes to minimum wage laws are thus likely to affect the fertility and career decisions of the rich.

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