Jean Lacroix, 17 June 2020

Last December, the US House of Representatives passed a bill to restore some of the provisions of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, which had been nullified in a 2013 Supreme Court decision. This column exploits variation resulting from the Act’s coverage formula to show that the Act decreased violence by both pro-segregationists and anti-segregationists, particularly before elections. The passing of the Act in 1965 thus appears to offer an example from US history of enfranchisement curbing political violence.

Dominic Rohner, Alessandro Saia, 05 May 2019

It is widely believed that education is a crucial factor in curbing political violence, but establishing causal evidence of this notoriously difficult. This column uses a large-scale school construction programme in Indonesia and newspaper reports of violence to tackle this problem. The results show that the construction of primary schools led to statistically significant reductions in conflict that grew larger over time. 

Hannes Mueller, Dominic Rohner, 22 January 2018

Power sharing has been proposed as a potential solution to political violence in ethnically or religiously diverse countries. Using data from the Troubles in Northern Ireland, this column shows that power sharing has significant and substantial effects in terms of curbing violence. These positive effects disappear when power sharing ends, however, implying that that political cooperation and inclusion need to be maintained in the long run if the benefits of lower violence are to continue.

Vox eBooks

Events

CEPR Policy Research