Daniel Auer, Johannes Kunz, 10 May 2022

Existing research on the integration of refugees has focused on the impact on the refugees themselves. This column uses the random allocation of refugees in Switzerland to show how allocation has significant effects even on future generations. Compared to children of refugees allocated to regions with an unfamiliar language, the children of mothers allocated to a familiar language environment have a higher birth weight on average, which is a predictor of outcomes including educational attainment, income, and health later in life. 

Francesco Fasani, Tommaso Frattini, Luigi Minale, 09 June 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought to light how much societies rely on migrants for key labour while highlighting the vulnerabilities of already weaker groups. Easing the socio-economic integration of migrants is beneficial to both migrants and host countries; yet, many European countries ban asylum seekers from legal employment upon arrival. This column examines the effect of such employment bans. The bans have large and lasting negative effects on refugees’ future labour-market integration and constitute an economic loss for the host country. Allowing early labour market access is an easily implementable and financially costless policy that effectively accelerates refugee integration.

Francesco Fasani, Tommaso Frattini, Luigi Minale, 09 April 2018

The lack of differentiation between refugees and other immigrants in immigration data presents major problems for researchers looking at refugee integration. This column uses novel European data to investigate factors affecting the integration of asylum seekers into host labour markets. The results suggest that allowing free residential mobility and reducing uncertainty in refugee status determination processes could improve future labour market outcomes.

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