José Cuesta, 07 August 2009

The food crisis caught some policymakers off guard. Will they be ready next time? This column argues that most studies of the crisis offer little in the way of tractable policy responses. This knowledge gap leaves policymakers unprepared to prevent or mitigate the next food price crisis.

Maros Ivanic, William Martin, 21 November 2008

Rising food prices are hurting many poor people across the globe. This column defends agricultural liberalisation, showing that agricultural protection actually increased over the last quarter-century in most poor countries and arguing that self-sufficiency would worsen food security. Policymakers should give direct aid to the very poor rather than resorting to export restrictions.

Nora Lustig, 22 October 2008

Sharp increases in world food prices over the last few years have impoverished millions. This column outlines the inadequacy of many countries’ safety nets and proposes means by which the international community might help poor consumers cope with rising food prices.

Erik Berglöf, 17 October 2008

Erik Berglof, chief economist at the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about the interlinkages between food markets, financial markets and development, particularly in the countries in which the EBRD operates, from central Europe to central Asia. The interview was recorded at the EBRD headquarters in London in October 2008 following a public discussion meeting on ‘Rising food prices: causes, consequences and remedies’.

Peter Timmer, 10 October 2008

Peter Timmer of Stanford University and the Centre for Global Development talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about the causes of high food prices – including the growth of China and India, dollar depreciation, biofuels and speculation – and the consequences – notably the renewed incentives for investment in raising agricultural productivity. The interview was recorded at the headquarters of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development in London in October 2008 following a public discussion meeting on ‘Rising food prices: causes, consequences and remedies’.

Nora Lustig, 10 October 2008

Nora Lustig of George Washington University talks to Romesh Vaitilingam about rising food prices – causes of the recent increases and how developing countries and international institutions should respond. The interview was recorded at the headquarters of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development in London in October 2008 following a public discussion meeting on ‘Rising food prices: causes, consequences and remedies’.

Juan Delgado, Indhira Santos, 09 October 2008

The financial crisis has turned attention away from the food crisis. Low- and middle-income countries face significant challenges, and this column proposes EU policy changes that could help.

Joseph Francois, 01 August 2008

The WTO talks were as much a distraction as an opportunity. The agenda was aimed at a world that no longer exists. Negotiations of some form should and will resume: the questions are "where?" and "between whom?" Success will require a different game, with different rules and different players. This column considers the options.

Rachel Griffith, Lars Nesheim, 14 July 2008

How much are households willing to pay for organic products? How does this vary across households? Why are people "going organic"? The authors of CEPR DP6905 look to answer these questions for the UK.

Stefan Tangermann, 22 July 2008

New research shows that India, China, and speculators are not the culprits in the food price explosion. Biofuels were a significant element in the 2005-2007 food price surge as they accounted for 60% of the growth in global consumption of cereals and vegetable oils. There cannot be any doubt that biofuels were a significant element in the rise of food prices. Since new research also shows that biofuel support policies are disappointingly ineffective on environmental grounds, governments should reconsider them.

Esther Duflo, 25 April 2008

Rising food prices are hurting many poor people, but they are helping poor agricultural producers. Food price volatility, on the other hand, is bad for everyone. This column explains poor people’s need for food price variability insurance.

Pages

Blogs&Reviews

Vox eBooks

Vox Talks

Events

CEPR Policy Research