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Technology greatly expanded the set of possible market/payment structures. Which ones look good on paper? And, will they work? Is regulatory intervention needed? This conference will take on these first-order topics.

  • What set of new market/payment structures did technology bring within reach?
  • What structure is desirable? Does it need regulatory intervention?
  • Is Mifid II adequate, or do we need Mifid III?

This conference explores how technology is changing securities markets. The preliminary programme consists of three panel sessions covering three broad themes. Each session will start with a 20-minute talk by a keynote speaker, followed by a panel session.

The conference is by invitation-only. If you wish to be considered for participation, please register your interest here.

Peter Bofinger, 12 June 2018

The digitalisation of money has the potential to change traditional structures of the financial system. This column discusses four areas in which it may have an impact, and argues that while digitalisation will not erode the importance of central banks, banks could be massively challenged by new forms of intermediation. 

Events

  • 17 - 18 August 2019 / Peking University, Beijing / Chinese University of Hong Kong – Tsinghua University Joint Research Center for Chinese Economy, the Institute for Emerging Market Studies at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, the Guanghua School of Management at Peking University, the Stanford Center on Global Poverty and Development at Stanford University, the School of Economics and Management at Tsinghua University, BREAD, NBER and CEPR
  • 19 - 20 August 2019 / Vienna, Palais Coburg / WU Research Institute for Capital Markets (ISK)
  • 29 - 30 August 2019 / Galatina, Italy /
  • 4 - 5 September 2019 / Roma Eventi, Congress Center, Pontificia Università Gregoriana Piazza della Pilotta, 4, Rome, Italy / European Center of Sustainable Development , CIT University
  • 9 - 14 September 2019 / Guildford, Surrey, UK / The University of Surrey

CEPR Policy Research