Edward Glaeser, Ming Lu, 15 September 2018

Comparing China’s per-capita GDP growth to the growth in years of schooling suggests a large role for human capital externalities. This column uses changes in the location of Chinese university departments in the 1950s to estimate that an extra year of schooling has been associated with 22.0% higher hourly wages across cities. Even so, the growth of Chinese education cannot explain the country’s massive increase in earnings.

Events

  • 17 - 18 August 2019 / Peking University, Beijing / Chinese University of Hong Kong – Tsinghua University Joint Research Center for Chinese Economy, the Institute for Emerging Market Studies at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, the Guanghua School of Management at Peking University, the Stanford Center on Global Poverty and Development at Stanford University, the School of Economics and Management at Tsinghua University, BREAD, NBER and CEPR
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  • 9 - 14 September 2019 / Guildford, Surrey, UK / The University of Surrey

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