Guillaume Chapelle, 20 May 2020

Non-pharmaceutical interventions such as school closures and social distancing were implemented in the US against the spread of the 1918 influenza pandemic. This column explores the effect of these interventions on economic activity and death rates in US cities during and after 1918. The policies lowered the fatality rate during the peak of the pandemic but are associated with a significant rise in the death rate in subsequent years, possibly through reducing herd immunity. Their impact, positive or negative, on the growth of the manufacturing sector in US cities remains an open question.

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US economists on the economic impact of the crisis and policy developments in the US and Europe.

with:
* Adam S. Posen, The Peterson Institute for International Economics
* Vivien A. Schmidt, Boston University
* Jeffry Frieden, Harvard University
* Michael Landesmann, Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies (wiiw)

The following questions will be addressed:
* How does the unfolding Covid-19 crisis compare so far between the US and Europe?
* How does the EMU/EU governance structure constrain monetary and fiscal responses compared to the US?
* Which failures in policy can be/could have been avoided?
* Which social and political outcomes do you expect on both sides of the Atlantic?
* How will the US and European responses affect global economic and political relations?

Ayça Tekin-Koru, 14 May 2020

The strict and prolonged age-specific containment measures in Turkey have both reduced infection/death rates and enabled less strict restrictions for the lower-risk groups. This column reviews Turkey’s response and examines the real-time effects of the COVID-19 crisis on production in Turkey. If finds that the targeted containment measures appear to have helped reduce a contraction in production that could have been much worse with a uniform lockdown. It also finds that the major brunt of the health crisis in terms of its human costs has been borne by the working class.

Klaus Desmet, Dávid Krisztián Nagy, Esteban Rossi-Hansberg, 02 October 2018

Assessments of the economic cost of a rise in sea-level are often limited to estimating the current value of structures and output in low-lying coastal areas. This column argues that understanding how economic activity will move when faced with flooding is key to correctly evaluating the cost of permanent inundation. When using a high-resolution dynamic spatial model of the world economy, combined with state-of-the-art local projections of sea-level rise for the next 200 years, the cost is substantially lower than when ignoring adaptation through moving. There is huge heterogeneity across space though, with some low-lying coastal areas hit particularly hard. 

CEPR Policy Research