Massimiliano Calì, Giorgio Presidente, 13 March 2022

Do automation technologies constitute an opportunity or a threat for developing countries? This column uses data on Indonesian manufacturing firms to document a positive impact on employment of adopting robots. This finding contrasts with the existing evidence of negative impacts in economies at relatively advanced stages of automation, and could be explained by diminishing returns to robots, given the relatively low robot adoption in Indonesia. 

Kristin Butcher, Kelsey Moran, Tara Watson, 22 February 2022

The caregiving workforce in the US will have to dramatically expand to meet the needs of the ageing population. This column argues that less-educated immigration could partially solve the problem. Using data from 1980 to 2017, the authors show that immigration increases the supply of home care for the elderly in the US and reduces its cost, while at the same time improving the quality of care for those who live in institutions.

Pierre Cahuc, Pauline Carry, Franck Malherbet, Pedro S. Martins, 20 January 2022

In 2009, Portugal restricted the use of fixed-term contracts by firms with over 750 employees. This column finds that while the reform was successful in reducing the number of fixed-term jobs, it did not increase the number of permanent contracts and it decreased employment in large firms. Despite positive spillovers on small firms, the reform reduced total employment and had negative effects on the welfare of employees and unemployed workers.

Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 03 December 2021

Josh Angrist, David Card, and Guido Imbens shared the Nobel in 2021 for their pioneering work on natural experiments that, in the words of the committee, "revolutionised empirical research". Steve Pischke tells Tim Phillips about the history of natural experiments, and the impact of the methods pioneered by this year's Laureates

Marco G. Palladino, Alexandra Roulet, Mark Stabile, 01 December 2021

What drives gender wage gaps – and how best to close them – remains a contested topic of economic research. Using data from matched employer-employee registers in France from 1995 to 2015, this column finds that discrepancies in pay are driven largely by men and women working in different firms rather than similar men and women being paid differently at the same firm. Understanding why the share of the gender gap ascribed to firms persists over time and across cohorts remains an essential policy puzzle for further reducing wage disparities. 

Daron Acemoğlu, 23 November 2021

Over the last decade, artificial intelligence has made great advances and influenced almost all industries. This column argues that the current AI technologies are more likely to generate various adverse social consequences, rather than the promised gains. It provides examples of the potential dangers for product markets, labour markets, and democratic institutions, and emphasises that the main problem is not AI itself, but the way leading firms are approaching data and their use. Policy should focus on redirecting technological change to create new capabilities and opportunities for workers and citizens.

Jörn-Steffen Pischke, 16 October 2021

The 2021 Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences has been awarded to David Card of the University of California, Berkeley, “for his empirical contributions to labour economics”, and to Joshua Angrist of MIT and Guido Imbens of Stanford University “for their methodological contributions to the analysis of causal relationships”. This column explains how the use of natural experiments in empirical economics has ushered in much progress in the analysis of causal relationships. The ensuing ‘credibility revolution’ over the past three decades has been transformational for the study of key policy challenges, including education, immigration and the minimum wage.

Hâle Utar, 28 March 2021

The Mexican Drug War, including the ostentatious killings and the targeting of civillians, has been amply covered in the media. What is less known are the economic impacts of the violence, particularly at the firm level. This column presents evidence from Mexican firms, focusing on the differing experiences of ‘blue-collar’ and ‘white-collar’ organisations. The results suggest that violence can cause a negative labour supply shock, particularly in sectors that more frequently employ lower-skilled female workers.

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To mark the occasion of the International Women’s Day, The Centre for Economic Policy Research and The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development invite you to an online event on the topic of Diversity and Prejudices in Labour Market and Society.

Despite some progress and success, many people continue to face social, economical, and political challenges in the 21st century. Why does gender inequality persist and how far have we progressed towards gender equality? Marianne Bertrand (University of Chicago and CEPR) will shine a light on the answers to these questions in her keynote speech on Gender in the 21st Century. An expert panel, including Anna Aizer (Brown University), Leah Boustan (Princeton University) and Rachel Griffith (University of Manchester, Institute for Fiscal Studies and CEPR), will follow the keynote speech with a discussion focused on the questions concerning diversity and prejudices in the labour markets and society in more detail.

We look forward to you joining us, as we embark on a journey to explore the uneven nature of diversity in labour markets.

Gordon Betcherman, Mauro Testaverde, 18 November 2020

The Covid-19 crisis has profoundly affected employment everywhere, but countries have adopted different strategies to try to mitigate the worst of the effects. This column compares the Greek experience to the rest of Europe, as well as to North America. The authors conclude that given the nature of the pandemic, models for managing labour market shocks will need to offer extended support where the shock persists or reoccurs. Crucially, successful policy approaches will need to be well suited for enabling job creation once conditions are in place for a restart.

Alex Rees-Jones, John D'Attoma, Amedeo Piolatto, Luca Salvadori, 04 November 2020

While few groups have weathered the Covid-19 crisis unscathed, recent evidence suggests that the damage has been especially extreme among the economically vulnerable. This column evaluates changing attitudes towards welfare spending as a result of the pandemic. The findings suggest that people living in areas most severely hit by the crisis are increasingly supportive of long-term reforms to the welfare system. Despite having access to relatively widespread welfare spending, European citizens are dissatisfied with the safety net systems currently in place. 

Erik Frohm, 11 October 2020

Until the outbreak of the Covid-19 crisis, wage growth had remained sluggish in many advanced economies, while labour markets appear to have improved substantially. This column argues that real-time indicators based on qualitative survey data provided an overly optimistic picture of labour market conditions in the aftermath of the Great Recession. A new establishment-level measure in Sweden, that utilises survey respondents’ quantitative assessments of labour shortages, overcomes some of the shortcomings of purely qualitative data and indicates that labour markets have typically been much weaker than initially assumed during the recovery. As labour shortages are strongly correlated with wage growth at the establishment level, their lower level can help explain why wage growth in Sweden has been sluggish. 

Steffen Juranek, Jörg Paetzold, Hannes Winner, Floris Zoutman, 12 September 2020

Sweden attracted international attention for not imposing a strict lockdown after the outbreak of COVID-19. This column analyses the labour market effects of this strategy by comparing unemployment and furlough spells in Sweden to three of its Nordic neighbours. The evidence suggests that the labour markets of all countries were severely hit by the pandemic, but Sweden performed slightly better than its neighbours. 

Giordano Mion, Luca David Opromolla, Gianmarco Ottaviano, 28 August 2020

Understanding whether certain jobs are ‘good’ or ‘bad’ is a complex question that can be approached in numerous ways. Clarifying what factors make particular occupations within particular firms suitable for different people is at the heart of this discussion. This column presents evidence from a study untaken in Portugal, focusing on domestic versus internationally active firms. The results indicate that firms which are more international provide better career paths for managers, perhaps due to better overall managerial practices.

Olivier Marie, Judit Vall Castello, 28 July 2020

Many governments increased temporary sick-leave benefits in the wake of COVID-19, but the benefits are due to expire after a certain time. This column looks back at a 2012 policy change in Spain which radically altered the generosity of paid sick leave available to public-sector employees. Following the change, the number of sick leaves taken by public-sector workers dropped 29% but the likelihood of relapses increased, with most of it driven by infectious disease relapses. Policymakers need to manage changes in sick-leave generosity, especially in the face of persistent or recurring infectious diseases such as COVID-19.

Egor Malkov, 22 July 2020

The lockdown measures have brought to light the importance of the nature of work. This column discusses how teleworkability and contact intensity of different jobs both shape the distribution of risks created by the pandemic. The existing distribution of working couples suggests that two-thirds of the US ‘dual-earner’ couples are exposed to greater intra-household contagion risk. About one-fourth are exposed to greater labour income risk. Patterns in skill requirements increase the likelihood of skill mismatch for the newly unemployed. These observations have direct policy implications whilst highlighting potential constraints on their effectiveness.

Jose Maria Barrero, Nicholas Bloom, Steven Davis, 14 July 2020

One of the most urgent economic impacts of the Covid-19 crisis is on labour markets. Widespread job losses, drastic increases in unemployment benefit claims, and the rise of working from home have dominated the discussion during the pandemic so far. This column presents evidence from the US, arguing that the pandemic itself represents reallocation of labour within the economy. As different sectors and occupations are hit with variable severity, the authors argue that policymakers should be wary of this variation, responding with policies that will hold firm over time.

Stefan Thewissen, Duncan MacDonald, Christopher Prinz, Maëlle Stricot, 08 July 2020

Paid sick leave is an important policy for protecting workers and their communities during a pandemic, serving not only to preserve jobs and incomes but also to contain the spread of the virus. This column examines how different countries implemented paid sick leave during the COVID-19 crisis. Evidence suggests such policies will facilitate an orderly end to lockdowns – and sustain workers during subsequent waves of infection – but only if temporary extensions are kept in place and broadened to include those workers currently denied coverage.

Christian Bredemeier, Falko Juessen, Roland Winkler, 28 June 2020

The COVID-19 crisis has disproportionately affected different occupations in the labour market. Workers in contact-intensive and personal-service oriented sectors bear the brunt of the COVID-19 recession, but blue-collar workers suffer heavy job losses as well. This column uses a multi-sector, multi-occupation macroeconomic model to study how different fiscal stimulus measures can boost aggregate demand and help the economy recover faster. It finds that a cut in taxes on labour income outperforms other stimulus plans in promoting job creation for those who lost their jobs in the COVID-19 downturn.

Stefano Federico, Fadi Hassan, Veronica Rappoport, 25 June 2020

In a period where the backlash against trade and globalisation is at historical high point, it is crucial to understand the frictions that prevent a full realisation of the gains from trade. This column takes evidence from Italy and contributes to the debate by identifying a novel channel: the endogenous funding constraint of banks whose loan portfolios are affected negatively by the liberalisation. There are spillovers between ‘losers’ and ‘winners’ from trade that operate through banks, which hinder the reallocation of resources towards firms that should actually expand after the liberalisation.

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