Carolina Lopez, Anja Sautmann, Simone Schaner, 29 January 2019

Healthcare systems around the world battle high rates of overtreatment. This column investigates the role of patient demand in this, using a randomised evaluation of malaria treatment at public health clinics in Mali. It finds no evidence of doctors attempting to increase treatment rates or intensity, instead heightened demand from patients sometimes pressured doctors into going against their own professional judgement and writing a prescription anyway. In such situations, interventions that make it easier for doctors to resist patient demands could help sustain subsidies and reduce overtreatment.

Jeffrey E. Harris, Mariana Gerstenblüth, Patricia Triunfo, 28 October 2018

The Surgeon General of the United States concluded in 1988 that the nicotine in cigarette smoke is an addictive drug. This column reports on an experiment which revealed that smokers, when confronted with warnings that were repugnant and threatening to many of them, could still make choices consistent with the widely accepted standard rules of rational choice. The model of the two-self economic man offers one explanation for how the participants could engage in such apparently rational behaviour in the face of their addiction.

Vox eBooks

Events

CEPR Policy Research