Mark Harrison, Alan Bollard, Walter Scheidel, Cormac Ó Gráda, 06 September 2019

Marking the 80th anniversary of the outbreak of the Second World War, some of the authors involved in VoxEU's series, The Economics of the Second World War: Eighty Years On, talk to Tim Phillips about their research.

Cormac Ó Gráda, 02 September 2019

Of WWII’s warring powers only the Soviet Union suffered mass starvation, but as this column, part of a Vox debate on the economics of WWII, describes, it is a measure of the war’s global reach that 20 to 25 million civilians died of hunger or hunger-related diseases outside Europe. In Britain effective rationing ensured a ‘fair’ distribution of food supplies throughout the war and in Germany the famine conditions experienced in 1918-19 were not replicated, but Japan was facing semi-starvation at war’s end. In Europe, apart from Greece and the Soviet Union, famine mortality was modest, but 3-5% of the populations of faraway Bengal, Henan, and Java perished. 

William J. Collins, Ariell Zimran, 19 January 2019

Negative sentiment towards immigrants is often based on fears about their ability to integrate into economic, political, and social institutions. This column analyses the impact of the influx of Irish immigrants into the US in the 19th century. It shows that the children of immigrants had assimilated in terms of labour market outcomes within one generation, providing some perspective for the current debate about immigration policy.

Hilary Hoynes, 26 May 2017

Famines during childhood have significant effects on adults’ lives. In this video, Hilary Hoynes discusses the impact of the Food Stamps programme on metabolic health in adulthood. This video was recorded at the Royal Economic Society Annual Conference held in Bristol in April 2017.

Stephen Broadberry, 11 November 2014

In the massive circumstances of total war, economic factors play the deciding role. Historians emphasise size in explaining the outcome of WWI, but this column argues that quality mattered as well as quantity. Developed countries mobilised resources in disproportion to their economic size – the level of development acted as a multiplier. With their large peasant sectors, the Central Powers could not maintain agricultural output as wartime mobilisation redirected resources from farming. The resulting urban famine undermined the supply chain behind the war effort.

Stephan Haggard, Marcus Noland, Erik Weeks, 07 June 2008

North Korea may be on the brink of famine. This column explains the crisis.

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